Samsung Galaxy S3 could pack a quad-core processor

The Samsung Galaxy S3 could pack a powerful quad-core processor, built by Samsung itself. Read on for details.

The Samsung Galaxy S3 could arrive sporting a quad-core processor, made by the South Korean tech giant itself.

Specifically, that chip could be a new Exynos processor called the Exynos 4412, evidence of which has been spotted in the Linux Kernel archive, indicating that the chip is an ARM Cortex A9-based quad-core affair.

Androidandme meanwhile claims to have received a tip stating the Galaxy S3 will be a "big step past the Galaxy Nexus class, in every way" which would suggest that Samsung is planning to trounce the newly released Galaxy Nexus' 1.2GHz dual-core processor.

We've also seen what's reportedly a leaked slide from a Samsung presentation that lists the S3 as having a 1.8GHz processor. That same slide also pegs the S3 as packing a 12-megapixel camera and a 4.6-inch screen, and we'd eat our own hands if the S3 didn't arrive running Android 4.0, aka Ice Cream Sandwich .

Asus meanwhile has its own quad-core toy queued up. The tortuously named Asus Eee Pad Transformer Prime  will be using a Tegra 3 processor, a quad-core monster that has a fifth companion chip that runs at 1.4GHz when you only need the one chip for less demanding tasks. 

We don't know the truth of the S3's processing grunt yet, but if we were Samsung we'd want to throw everything we had at the Galaxy S3. Thanks to the success of the S2 it has the potential to be a hugely popular phone, and with Apple releasing an incremental update to the iPhone in the shape of the 4S , there's a golden opportunity for Samsung to really impress the phone-buying public next year.

Quad-core is looking to be a theme for next year, but will chucking ludicrously powerful chips into smart phones and tablets be enough? Tell us in the comments, or on Facebook.

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About the author

Luke Westaway is a senior editor at CNET and writer/ presenter of Adventures in Tech, a thrilling gadget show produced in our London office. Luke's focus is on keeping you in the loop with a mix of video, features, expert opinion and analysis.

 

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