Samsung Galaxy S2 and Note denied Android 5.0, report says

Reports claim that Samsung's much-loved S2 and Note won't be getting any updates past Jelly Bean.

Samsung's much-adored Galaxy S2 and Note smart phones are about to hit the end of the update trail, if one report citing insider info is to be believed.

Updates to 2011's Galaxy S2 and 5.3-inch Galaxy Note will stop with Android 4.2.2, SamMobile reports, meaning those two popular mobiles may not be enjoying all the treats found within Google's next version of Android, rumoured to be called 5.0 Key Lime Pie.

Reportedly in line for that new edition are the Galaxy S3, S3 LTE and the brand-new Galaxy S4, as well as the Note 2, Note 8 and Note 10.1.

It's good news that those fresher phones are in line for spangly new updates, but -- if these rumours turn out to be true -- it would be sad to see the Galaxy S2 stop receiving new software, and bad news for the millions of people who own the once-mighty 4.3-inch smart phone.

It's common for phone makers to stop updating their devices after a while, as it takes time and effort to wrap a new version of Android around manufacturer-specific interfaces like Samsung's TouchWiz, or HTC's Sense.

Usually older, slower components are blamed for a lack of new software, though a video from last August showing Android Jelly Bean running on the first ever Android phone demonstrates that older mobiles can often handle new updates with aplomb.

Key Lime Pie is expected to make its arrival on a new Nexus phone -- potentially one built by Motorola, though recent leaked snaps hint at another LG-built device.

Is it time to retire the Galaxy S2? Or should Samsung treat its famous phone to another round of Android updates? Let me know your thoughts in the comments, or on our Facebook wall.

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