Samsung Galaxy Fit but you Froyo it

I think you are really fit but my gosh! Don't you just know it, sang the Streets. It's the Samsung Galaxy Fit!

You're fit but my gosh -- don't you just know it, as The Streets' tower block laureate Mike Skinner once sang. Perhaps that's where Samsung got the name of the Samsung Galaxy Fit, officially announced today. Maybe that means we could soon see the Samsung Galaxy Mug or Galaxy Wasn't Famous. Or maybe not. So how fit is the Fit?

The Fit is powered by Android version 2.2, or Froyo, with Samsung's TouchWiz UI slathered on the top. It also packs speedy Swype typing and Samsung's Social Hub unified inbox, bringing together email and social-network updates.

It packs a 3.3-inch QVGA touchscreen and 600MHz processor. There's a paltry 158MB of memory built-in, but the phone comes with a 2GB microSD card and can fit up to 32GB of microSD storage. (Fit! That one wasn't even deliberate.)

The 5-megapixel camera captures continuous bursts, stitches together panoramic shots, and waits for you to smile before snapping. It shoots QVGA video in MPEG4 format.

Connection comes courtesy of 3G, Bluetooth and 802.11n Wi-Fi. Other Fit features include a stereo FM radio and voice recorder, as well as GPS and Google Maps. Still in beta, Google Maps 5.0 for Android will bring 3D maps and navigation to Android phones.

The Galaxy Fit arrives alongside the Galaxy Gio, Ace and Mini today, joining the popular Galaxy S and Galaxy Tab. You'll be able to witness the Fitness from March -- but we'll have the first hands-on preview here at CNET UK in February, all the way from annual phonefest Mobile World Congress.

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