Samsung details Galaxy S2 Jelly Bean update

The latest version of Android is coming to the venerable Galaxy S2, Samsung has promised.

We heard whispers a few months ago that the venerated Samsung Galaxy S2 would be updated to spangly new Android Jelly Bean, but then it all went quiet. Until now, that is, as Samsung has posted some details on its website.

It's its Korean website, admittedly, but if it's coming to our Seoul sisters, surely us Brits with S2s can't have much longer to wait.

The hawk-eyed Android fanatics at XDA Developers spotted the info. The handset can be updated using Kies -- Samsung's app that requires you to plug your phone into your computer. Samsung has revealed how it'll affect your S2 once you upgrade, too. Jelly Bean will take up a fair bit of space, so your memory will drop one gigabyte, from 12GB to 11GB.

It'll come to all three networks in Korea. Google Plus will come as part of the package, along with some Google Play apps and Samsung's own Smart Stay feature, which detects when you're looking at the screen and keeps it lit. Smart Stay debuted on the Galaxy S3.

There's no word on exactly when the update will roll out to Korean S2s, but the fact it's on the website must bode well. Surely it can't be as bad as the palaver of getting Ice Cream Sandwich on an S2.

Jelly Bean is also on its way to the original Galaxy Note, proving it's not just for the newest handsets. The latest version of Android is on 10 per cent of all devices now, which isn't bad going considering it's been out for six months. Android updates are typically pretty slow to trickle down, so I think it's great that older devices aren't being left out of the Jelly Bean jamboree.

Have you had a taste of Jelly Bean yet? What do you reckon? Let me know in the comments, or on our up to date Facebook page.

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