Roku Streaming Stick hits UK, costs £50

Roku's new streaming device plugs into the HDMI socket of your telly and beams TV shows, films and more from the Internet.

A new Roku device is coming to the UK. The Roku Streaming Stick is about the size of a USB stick, and plugs straight into your HDMI port on your telly. The version that was previously released in the US only worked with a Roku Ready TV, of which there were only a handful. They were also made by mostly lesser-known companies. But for us Brits, Roku has opened it up and made it compatible with any telly with an HDMI port. Jolly good.

Then all you need is a Wi-Fi connection, and you can start streaming all your games and movies to your gogglebox.

You can use the Wi-Fi remote to navigate the menu, or you can use your Android or iOS device, once you've downloaded the Roku app. Soon you'll be able to stream direct from your computer to your telly too, using the Streaming Stick.

The Streaming Stick gives you access to more than 750 channels in the form of apps, including TV shows, films, news, sport, social networking, games, and more. These include Sky News, Facebook, 4oD, Ted Talks, YouTube, Angry Birds, and our very own CNET channel. You can watch in 1080p HD resolution.

The Roku Streaming Stick is available to pre-order now from Amazon, Currys, and Roku's own site. It'll go on sale in late April, and will cost £49.99, which is a bit pricier than its direct rivals. Sky's Now TV Box -- which is basically a rebadged Roku set-top box -- costs just a tenner. And Google's Chromecast is just $35 (£21), though it isn't available on these shores yet.

What do you think of the Roku Streaming Stick? Would you buy one? What does it have over the competition? Let me know in the comments, or stream your thoughts over to our Facebook page.

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