Robert Doisneau's 100th birthday celebrated by Google doodle

The legendary photographer is the latest to become the subject of the Google doodle on the search giant's home page.

The French photographer Robert Doisneau is the latest person to get their own Google doodle . The doodle shows a montage of some of his most famous photos.

Doisneau is best known for his photo "The Kiss by the Town Hall" in which an unsuspecting couple pucker up, oblivious to the hustle and bustle surrounding them. Today would've been Doisneau's 100th birthday.

The infamous snap caused some controversy: a couple, believing themselves to be those pictured, tried to sue Doisneau after it was published in Life magazine in 1950. In court, the snapper revealed it was another couple he'd seen kissing, and had asked them to model for him all around Paris.

Doisneau was a pioneer of photojournalism alongside Henri Cartier-Bresson, and specialised in street scenes. Lots of his pictures showed children at play in Paris, unfettered by adults. A number of primary schools were named after him in his honour.

He worked as an industrial advertising photographer for car company Renault, but was fired in 1939 for constantly being late. He started snapping for postcards, and was hired by Charles Rado of the Rado photo agency. Travelling the world in search of good photo stories was Doisneau's first taste of professional street photographs.

After the war he worked for Vogue, but found it limiting snapping beautiful women in elegant surroundings, preferring to document street life. He never ridiculed his subjects, hence he refused to photograph women whose heads had been shaved as punishment for sleeping with the Germans. He was quoted as saying: "I don't photograph life as it is, but life as I would like it to be".

As television had the knock-on effect of closing down a lot of photo-story magazines, Doisneau moved into celebrity portraits to supplement his income. He won awards including the Kodak Prize, the Balzac Prize, and Grand Prix National de la Photographie. He died in 1994.

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