Queen's Diamond Jubilee celebrated with Google doodle

Google is getting in on the Jubilee celebrations, turning its logo into a doodle featuring the Queen.

Head to the Google home page today and you'll see a new doodle celebrating the Queen's Diamond Jubilee. The Google logo has been transformed into a picture featuring a pair of diamonds, two of Her Majesty's corgies, and the lady herself, with the E of Google perched atop her crown.

For my money it's not quite as good as Marmite's effort, but a nice touch nonetheless.

The Diamond Jubilee celebrates Queen Elizabeth II's 60 years on the throne, and the festivities start today. Her Majesty will be visiting Epsom Derby later, but to kick things off, the Royal Navy warship HMS Diamond fired a 21-gun salute across Portsmouth harbour.

Tomorrow will see the diamond jubilee pageant -- a 1,000 strong flotilla -- sail down the Thames. Up to a million people are expected to line the banks of the river to watch. A royal barge will lead the pageant.

On Monday the diamond jubilee concert will see Madness take to the roof of Buckingham Palace. And on Tuesday there will be a service of thanksgiving in St Paul's Cathedral, which will probably be a more sober affair than the concert the night before. After the service, Her Majesty will come out onto the balcony to acknowledge the tens of thousands of revellers expected to fill the Mall.

A couple of years ago Her Majesty dropped in on RIM's factory in Canada, and was handed a personalised BlackBerry. This was in the heady days before RIM started struggling quite like it is today. And the Queen's speech was released as a free download for the Kindle at Christmas, so the royal household is no stranger to tech.


What do you reckon of the doodle? Has Google missed an opportunity to make it interactive? Let me know in the comments below, or on our Facebook page.

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