Porsche shows off stripped down, hotted-up Cayman R

Porsche unveils the 2012 Porsche Cayman R: a lighter, stronger, faster version of the highly praised Cayman S.

Porsche's Cayman R is 121 pounds lighter and 10 horsepower stronger than the Cayman S.
Porsche's Cayman R is 121 pounds lighter and 10 horsepower stronger than the Cayman S. Daniel Terdiman/CNET

Updated with video after the jump.

The 2010 Los Angeles Auto Show coincides with Porsche's celebration of 60 years in the U.S. market. Drawing a line back to its first racing vehicle ever built, the midengined 1938 Type 65, Porsche unveiled the 2012 Porsche Cayman R: a lighter, stronger, faster version of the highly praised Cayman S.

The Cayman R drops 121 pounds of bulk versus the S thanks to a diet that includes the omission of the infotainment system, lighter aluminum door skins, carbon-fiber-backed sport bucket seats, and interior door panels from the 911 GT3 RS. In addition to being lighter, the R is also more powerful squeezing 10 more ponies out of the same 3.4-liter direct-injection six-cylinder boxer engine that lives under the hood of the S model for a total of 330 horsepower. Zero to 60 mph comes in 4.7 seconds. Top speed with the manual transmission jumps to 175 mph--with the automatic PDK that number drops to 174 mph.

The R's suspension has been lowered by 20mm all around and its chassis has received tweaks to make the coupe more responsive and agile. Standard on the R, but optional on the S, is a limited slip differential and the Cayman aerodynamics kit. Of course, the R also gets upgraded brakes and special rolling stock--the same 19-inch wheel-and-tire package that can be found on the Boxter Spyder.

Expect the Cayman R to carry an MSRP of $66,300 when it debuts in February 2011.

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