Photos: Latest mobile phones from Japan

Want a futuristic handset with jaw-dropping features that will simplify your life and make you a better person? Then you might want to move to Japan

If you think the mobile phones we have here in the UK are cutting edge, think again. Japan's mobile phones are so advanced that the entire country yawned sarcastically when the iPhone was announced.

From phones that can tell who their owner is using facial recognition, to phones that let you buy things over the counter by simply touching a sensor, the list of features available on Japanese phones is practically endless.

Check out some of this year's highlights -- including a phone you can dunk in the bath, a phone that can tell the mood of a text message and even one that uses Sony's Bravia TV technology.

First up is the Fujitsu F703i (pictured) that can impressively be submerged in 1m of water for 30 minutes. It also comes with a relax mode that makes the handset play sounds and glow with colours chosen by a colour-therapy expert. A perfect phone for anyone who likes to unwind in the bath.

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This is the Mitsubishi D800iDS clamshell phone, which features a touchscreen instead of a keypad. You can use the touchscreen to dial numbers on a virtual keypad or write and draw on it using a stylus.

With the  launch of the LG Prada phone and iPhone later this year in the UK, it looks like touchscreens are going to become more and more common in the UK's mobile phone landscape, so start getting used to them.

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The Sony Ericsson SO703i has interchangeable face plates which unusually features a fragrance. It also uses Sony's Bravia TV technology in its display and comes with a version of the excellent PSP game LocoRoco.

Word on the street is Sony Ericsson will launch handsets in the UK that also integrate Sony's Bravia tech -- fingers crossed it's true.

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Like the Fujitsu F703i, the Panasonic P703i can be submerged in 1m of water for 30 minutes. The other impressive feature, which isn't on the Fujitsu, is the feel-mail function, which analyses the text of messages received and displays one of 45 animations depending on the emotion it detects. We're not sure how useful this is, but nevertheless we want it over here in the UK right now.

 

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