Photos: Acer Aspire 8920 18-inch widescreen laptop

Acer has sent us a pre-production Aspire 8920 to play with -- it's the world's first widescreen 18-inch laptop, so it's only right we take a bunch of pretty photos and show it off

Recently we told you about two new widescreen Acer laptops, the 16-inch Aspire 6920, and the 18.4-inch Aspire 8920 -- part of the Gemstone Blue series. Today Acer sent us a pre-production Aspire 8920 to play with, so it's only right we take a bunch of photos and show it off.

Credit to Acer for being the first to deliver a laptop with an 18.4-inch screen. This runs at a native resolution of 1,920x1,080 pixels and has a true widescreen 16:9 aspect ratio. This means movies played on its integrated Blu-ray drive will fit the screen perfectly. Most laptops run at 16:10, which isn't quite what the moviemakers intended.

The next notable inclusion is the capacitive media controls on the far left side. Volume is adjusted by sliding your finger up or down the volume arc, and below that you'll find all the usual media controls such as play, pause, skip, forward and stop -- all of which are touch-sensitive. The design works surprisingly well and reminds us of the instrument panel on the Starship Enterprise.

The Aspire 8920 has an integrated subwoofer. Nothing unusual in that -- many desktop replacements have one -- but the way it's implemented here may surprise you. The tubular hinge between the screen and keyboard section is used as an enclosure to enhance the low notes. Does it work? Does it heck. Looks nice, though.

Core specs include an Intel Core 2 Duo T8300 running at 2.4GHz, 3GB of RAM, twin 250GB hard drives, and the latest ATI Radeon graphics cards. In other words it's a fantastic all-rounder and an ideal replacement for your desktop PC.

The Aspire 8920 is set for an April release. Click 'Next Photo' to have a look at the photos and wait with bated breath for a full review soon. -Rory Reid

Update: Read our full Acer Aspire 8920G preview

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