Nikon D4S pro DSLR specs revealed: it's faster than the D4

Nikon has revealed the full specs of the D4S, the successor to the D4, and speed is the name of the game.

Nikon has announced the specs of the D4S professional-level DSLR. The camera was revealed before, but this is the first full spec rundown we've had. And the headline news is that it's 30 per cent faster to process images than its predecessor, the D4.

That's thanks to the latest Expeed 4 engine, which gives it more processing power than ever. There's a new 16.2 megapixel sensor inside too. That's the same resolution as the D4 though, so its photos won't be radically more detailed.

It should perform better in low light than the D4. ISO 25600 is standard, with the snapper's 'Hi' settings delivering an equivalent of ISO 409600. So no matter how dark it is, your shots should come out clear and detailed. Nikon recommends it for the kind of 'dirty' low light conditions that sports and news photographers have to deal with.

The movie mode has also been improved. A new 2.7x crop mode means you can get pixel-for-pixel 1080p capture, which should make your videos better than ever.

It's built for the outdoors. A tough weather-sealed body should withstand the elements, and the hand grip has been redesigned to make it more ergonomic. Nikon has changed the button layout and reshaped the buttons to make it easier to handle out in wet conditions.

Nikon's autofocus system has come on a step further, too. Lock-on has been improved, making it easier to focus on the right part of the image. Plus you have more control over the size of the autofocus area, so you can really zero in on what you want.

Unfortunately, it doesn't look much snazzier than other DSLRs. It'll go on sale on 6 March for £5,199.99 for the body only.

What do you think of it? Let me know in the comments, or on our Facebook page.

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