Motorola Razr and Razr Maxx upgraded to ICS

Motorola has rolled out the update for the two Razr handsets.

The Motorola Razr and Razr Maxx should have Android Ice Cream Sandwich ready as an over-the-air update as I write this very sentence, Android Central reports.

Motorola posted on its Facebook page this week that the update was "rolling out to select users, and will be available more broadly over the coming week".

Anyone in the US with the handsets (known Stateside as the Droid Razr and Droid Razr Maxx), had the update back in June, so it's taken its time making its way across the pond. It's even more annoying considering Google owns Motorola, so you'd think Moto would be first in line come update time.

The Razr stands just 7.1mm thick, with a 4.3-inch screen and an 8-megapixel camera around the back. It also packs a dual-core processor and 1GB of RAM. The Razr Maxx is a little fatter than the Razr, at 8.9mm. That's to accommodate its 3,300mAh battery that should give it more than 17 hours of talk time. That's more than enough to handle you yapping on about the latest Android update.

Both shipped with Android 2.3 Gingerbread, so while ICS is no Jelly Bean, it is a welcome addition.

Head to the handy section of Motorola's website, and you'll see ICS is set to roll out to the Razr in Q3 this year. So it looks like it's bang on schedule. The Razr Maxx isn't listed for Europe though, so I'll assume Moto meant to have it down as the same time as the Razr.

Ice Cream Sandwich lets you group apps in folders and you can unlock the screen using facial recognition. Samsung announced its Galaxy Tab range would be upgraded to Ice Cream Sandwich recently. Last month Google unveiled Jelly Bean, its successor, but so far only a handful of devices can run it.

Has your handset seen the jump to ICS yet? Let me know in the comments or on our Facebook page.

Featured Video

Behmor's app controlled coffee maker links to the Web for better brewing

The $329 Behmor Connected Coffee Brewer boasts the guts of an SCAA-approved drip coffee maker melded with a Wi-Fi radio, plus Internet links and mobile app control all in the interest of creating better pots of java.

by Brian Bennett