LG bringing Intel smart phone to CES?

Intel will have a new chip for smart phones soon, and it looks like LG could be one of the first manufacturers to build a phone based on it.

Your next smart phone could be powered by an Intel chip, if a report from The Korea Times is to be believed, CNET reports. It says LG is preparing to show off an Intel-powered Android handset at CES in January, and it even quotes spokespeople from both companies backing it up.

When LG was contacted for an official line however, it was keen to deny the rumours.

"LG Electronics will produce Intel's first Android smart phones that use Intel's own mobile platform," a 'top-ranking executive' from LG told the paper on Friday. "The device will be shown at the CES."

"[O]ne clear point is that Intel is spending heavily for more efficient mobile chips for phones and tablets."

Intel Korea chief Lee Hee-sung told the paper, "Intel's chief executive Paul Otellini will release Intel's first Android smart phone using our own platform at the CES."

But another LG executive, asking not to be named, was more skeptical. "Personally, I doubt that LG Electronics will release phones running on Android software based on any Intel platform," they said. "It's quite possible for LG to push Intel's reference mobiles but with huge subsidies from Intel for promotion."

LG showed off an Intel-powered handset at CES 2011, but it never went on sale, with both companies citing a lack of marketability. It also showcased the Optimus 2X (pictured), the first dual-core smart phone, so it could be the case that now people are more accustomed to using such powerful phones, LG thinks the time is right to unleash an Intel-powered handset.

HTC is also rumoured to announce a handset powered by the new Nvidia Tegra 3 processor, the same chip powering the Asus Transformer Prime as well as the rumoured Acer Iconia Tab A700.

Would you buy an Intel-powered LG phone? Let us know on our Facebook page, or below in the comments.

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