Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga, first Windows 8 tablet, costs £1,200

It could be the first Windows 8 tablet -- it's the Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga, and it's been priced at £1,200.

What could be the first Windows 8 tablet has a price tag. We hope you're not standing on your head right now, because the Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga will cost £1,200, the company has revealed.

The Yoga is an ultrabook laptop with a folding screen that bends over backwards to turn the whole thing into a tablet, like the Asus Eee PC T101MT . It's powered by Windows 8, the next generation of Microsoft's venerable operating system which will run both computers and tablets. The basic model costs £1,200, and a more powerful Core i7 model costs an even more kundalini-disturbing £1,500.

An ultrabook is a slimline laptop using the latest Intel chips, such as the Samsung Series 5 or Acer Aspire S3 -- here's our guide to the best ultrabooks so far.

When it coined the name, Intel promised ultrabooks would start from around £600, and the subtext was clear: these are svelte laptops for people who don't want to drop £1,100 or so on a MacBook Air . The Samsung Series 5 costs around £850 and the Acer S3 around £600.

With that in mind, £1,200 seems like an awful lot for the Yoga, so it remains to be seen if that price tag remains unchanged when it actually hits shelves, on a date that's yet to be confirmed. Update: Lenovo tells us to expect the Yoga "around October".

We'd be a bit more forgiving of that price tag if the screen split off on its own to become a lightweight tablet so you were actually getting both tablet and laptop, a bit like the Asus Transformer Prime or the saucer section of the USS Enterprise. But it doesn't, and at 17mm the Yoga is perfectly slim for a laptop but pretty hefty for a tablet.

Is £1,200 justified for the Lenovo Yoga? Are ultrabooks and tablets a good fit? Will Windows 8 transform the tablet market? Align your chakras and leave us a comment in the comments or on our Facebook page.

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About the author

Rich Trenholm is a senior editor at CNET where he covers everything from phones to bionic implants. Based in London since 2007, he has travelled the world seeking out the latest and best consumer technology for your enjoyment.

 

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