Karen Finley wants to turn your sexts into art

The performance artist, a member of the famed NEA Four who played a key role in the '90s culture wars, plans to create a series of paintings inspired by sexts. R U in, hottie?

Your sexting artistry can now be immortalized as art. CBS

Do you consider yourself a sexting master (or mistress)? If so, artist Karen Finley wants u, u sexy beast.

Finley -- a well-known and sometimes controversial performance artist -- is planning a series of paintings inspired by sexts. The works will be displayed later this month in New York's New Museum as part of an interactive installation called "Sext Me if You Can."

If you're wondering how that beloved cleavage shot would look like on a canvas above your couch, be advised that not just any of your favorite sexy missives or nudie pics will do.

Interested sexters will be asked to pay between $200 and $500 for a 10-minute private, anonymous on-site sitting during which they'll get access to a private phone number created expressly for sending Finley sexts. The message will, in turn, serve as the inspiration for a painting, or series of paintings, created by the artist in a temporary studio set up in the New Museum lobby and displayed from May 23-26.

Karen Finley Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

"Through this process, the erotic exchange with the artist -- bound by rules of commerce -- transforms into a lasting and collectible work of art," reads a New Museum description of the project. Once the exhibit is over, participating patrons get to take home one of the paintings inspired by their sext.

Finley is one of four solo performers participating in the New Museum's NEA 4 in Residence program. The museum has invited the so-called NEA Four artists who played a key role in the culture wars of the '90s to tackle contemporary issues surrounding funding for performance art today.

And while we're looking forward to seeing Finley's artistic interpretations, we probably won't be running a photo gallery. Sry!

About the author

Leslie Katz, Crave's senior editor, heads up a team that covers the most crushworthy (and wackiest) tech, science, and culture around. As a co-host of the now-retired CNET News Daily Podcast, she was sometimes known to channel Terry Gross and still uses her trained "podcast voice" to bully the speech recognition software on automated customer service lines. E-mail Leslie.

 

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