Jelly Bean leaks on T-Mobile Galaxy S3, but has bugs

You can get Jelly Bean on your T-Mobile Galaxy S3 now, but at your own risk.

Good news, of sorts, if you own a Samsung Galaxy S3 on T-Mobile. Android Jelly Bean has leaked a few days early for the T-Mo version of the Editors' Choice-winning smart phone.

Though it's far from perfect. And as with any leaked software, you download it at your own risk.

The leak was posted over at the XDA Developers forums, Android Police reports. If you want to run it on your T-Mobile Galaxy S3, you'll need to run the stock T-Mobile Ice Cream Sandwich ROM, aka T999UVALH2.

A version of Jelly Bean leaked last week, but that was restricted to US Galaxy S3 owners.

So what about these bugs then? Some brave early downloaders have reported losing root access . Others have said Wi-Fi calling doesn't work, and they've also reported bugs with the stock browser and video player. Worst of all, Google Now might not work -- which seems to miss the whole point of the download -- and there may be some issues in general performance.

Maybe just wait until the official update on Wednesday , eh?

Google Now knows where you are and what you're up to, and provides you with info relevant to your situation. So if you're setting out on your commute, it'll tell you train and bus times, traffic info, the weather, and more.

If you do take the plunge with this leaked update -- and again, I have to stress it's at your own risk -- let me know how you get on in the comments below, or on Facebook.

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About the author

    Joe has been writing about consumer tech for nearly seven years now, but his liking for all things shiny goes back to the Gameboy he received aged eight (and that he still plays on at family gatherings, much to the annoyance of his parents). His pride and joy is an Infocus projector, whose 80-inch picture elevates movie nights to a whole new level.

     

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