iPhone 5C pre-orders a tenth of previous launches

British networks are reporting pre-orders for the iPhone 5C are a fraction of what was expected, or seen in previous years.

The iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C might not be the big payday everybody hoped. British networks report pre-orders for the 5C are a disappointing fraction of what was expected, or seen in previous launches.

According to The Guardian, one network says pre-orders are as little as a tenth of the number of early orders placed for previous iPhones.

Previous launches have seen Brits order between 75,000 and 100,000 iPhones, with the iPhone 5 bought and paid for over 2 million times around the world before it had even hit shop shelves.

Worldwide sales may still do well because this is the first time China will get the new phone from day one.

But UK pre-orders for the 5C are said to be well off the mark of expectations -- as much as 70 per cent less than hoped.

There could be any number of reasons the 5C isn't selling well. Perhaps phone fans are waiting to buy the iPhone 5S instead when it comes out on Friday, having not been available for pre-order. Maybe they just really want to queue. Perhaps they're not close enough to the end of their contracts to upgrade yet.

Maybe their fingers have spontaneously dropped off, preventing them from clicking their mouse to complete the purchase.

Or maybe everyone with a lick of sense has balked at the fact the thing costs £469, less than a hundred quid less than the 5S; and even a network deal can cost £40 per month or more.

If you're yet to decide which iPhone you want, check out our handy comparison of the best deals and prices for the iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C.


Is the iPhone 5C set to be a flop? Will it gather momentum once shops are open, or has the Apple bubble burst? Tell me your thoughts in the comments or on our Facebook page.

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