iPhone 5 bigger battery in leaked photos

Photos purporting to show the new iPhone's reveal a larger battery.

We've already got a pretty good idea what the iPhone 5 will look like from all different angles, but now we've got a glimpse of the inside too.

Photos purporting to show the new iPhone's innards have leaked ahead of the new phone's launch. They include another glimpse of the elongated screen, and -- if real -- reveal a larger battery.

Snaps leaked by show off the alleged larger battery pack. The battery is set to be a 1440mAh powerhouse, an increase on the 1430mAh battery in the 4S. The voltage is also now 3.8V, up from 3.7.

Apple has increased the battery size to power the larger screen, which will measure 4 inches corner-to-corner. Leaked photos suggest the new iPhone will be taller than the current model when you hold it normally, or wider when you turn it sideways to landscape orientation.

That means the screen will be 16:9, banishing black bars when you watch movies and TV and allowing video to make the most of the screen real estate -- which will no doubt suck up more juice.

Apple has shrunk other components to save every scrap of space in the new iPhone to make space for the battery. The new phone will have a smaller SIM card and smaller dock connector , rendering current docks and cables obsolete unless you plug them into a special adaptor .

Other leaked snaps from China, via France, appear to show the sensors, home button and a component that looks like a happy dancing chap. We also get our first look at the tray for the new cut-down nano-SIM card .

The new iPhone 5 is expected to be unveiled in September .

Tags:
Phones
About the author

Rich Trenholm is a senior editor at CNET where he covers everything from phones to bionic implants. Based in London since 2007, he has travelled the world seeking out the latest and best consumer technology for your enjoyment.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Love heavy and clunky tablets?

Said no one ever. CNET brings you the lightest and thinnest tablets on the market.