iOS 7, GTA 5 and the future of texting in Podcast 337

We're all about odd numbers this week, as episode 337 asks what Apple's operating system needs to do next.

Roll up, roll up folks! It's time for your weekly dose of CNET UK's shockingly informative, brilliantly entertaining podcast! Hit play on the audio version to your right, or scroll down slightly for a full-colour video version!

What does the future hold for Apple's mobile software? The iconic iOS interface has remained broadly unchanged since its introduction in 2007, but now rumours are swirling that new software head Jony Ive is giving Apple's famous interface a radical revamp.

Gloss and 3D effects are reportedly being chucked in the bin, in favour of a 'flat' look, that could borrow more from the minimalist design seen in Apple's hardware.

In this week's 'cast, your favourite team of eagle-eyed tech'sters ask whether it's high time that iOS was given a lick of paint, or whether Apple would be foolish to tinker with something that's already working fine.

Luke, Andy and special guest star Seb Ford from GameSpot will also be talking about Grand Theft Auto 5, and whether three new trailers for the game have set our hearts aflame -- or not.


In other news, texting is dead -- long live texting! The humble word-based communication medium is as popular as ever, but new figures suggest phone owners are ditching SMS in favour of Internet-based IM apps like WhatsApp and Viber. What does that mean for UK phone networks?

You'll also hear about a supremely tasty ebook reader bargain, and Microsoft's IllumiRoom concept -- is it the future of gaming? Or simply a Kinect Sellotaped to a projector?

As always, we'll be rounding off with your feedback, and -- of course -- Otamatone review.

Do you have a tech conundrum you'd like us to tackle? Say so in the comments, or sound off on our Facebook wall.

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