Impulse buy? Sagita to sell $200,000 personal helicopter

A Belgian company hopes to persuade wealthy people as well as businesses to buy its ultralight two-seater helicopter. It showed a prototype at the Paris Air Show.

Sagita plans to sell its two-passenger Sherpa helicopter for about $200,000 in three years. It showed this prototype at the Paris Air Show.
Sagita plans to sell its two-passenger Sherpa helicopter for about $200,000 in three years. It showed this prototype at the Paris Air Show. Stephen Shankland/CNET

LE BOURGET, France -- OK, so you've got a couple hundred thousand dollars burning a hole in your pocket. Sure, you could buy that flashy sports car. But why not a personal helicopter if you really want to make a statement.

That's what Sagita Helicopters hopes you'll do with its Sherpa, a dual-rotor, dual-passenger aircraft that the Belgian company showed off here at the Paris Air Show. The Sherpa has a 280-mile range (400km), said Thibaud Waltregny, business development manager for GDTech Engineering, which worked on the design.

"It's enough to get you everywhere in Belgium," Waltregny said.

The ultralight craft weighs 575 pounds and can carry a payload of up to 378 pounds more, he said. It won't break any speed records with a cruising speed of 98mph, but with a planned price of 150,000 euros, or about $200,000, he thinks it'll find buyers.

Along with wealthy hobbyists, the helicopter could appeal to companies checking pipelines and power lines, he said.

The rear of the Sagita Sherpa two-person helicopter.
The rear of the Sagita Sherpa two-person helicopter, on display at the Paris Air Show. Stephen Shankland/CNET

The helicopter uses a design with two sets of rotors that spin in opposite directions, an approach that is naturally balanced and that improves safety of nearby people by dropping the tail rotor.

It's only a prototype today, though. The company has built a one-fifth scale prototype that flies and is working on a full-scale prototype now.

"We expect to fly in two years, and get certification within three years," Waltregny said.

The initial market is Europe, but Sagita got interest at the air show to sell it in Canada and Russia, too.

Tags:
Sci-Tech
About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

CNET's Christmas Gift Guide

'Tis the season for a gadget upgrade

Check out these 8 tablets you'll want to bring home for the holidays.