HP refreshes laptops with Envy 14 and 17, new Pavilion models and ugly Mini 210

HP has refreshed its Envy, Pavilion and Mini laptop ranges. Click the story for UK pricing, but we warn you the picture is one ugly laptop

HP has had a good old shake-up of its laptop line. The Envy 14 and Envy 17 join the Pavilion dm1, dm3, dm4, dv3, dv6 and dv7 in the refreshed line-up. Less refreshing is a new-look pink Mini 210, which fell out of the ugly tree, hit every branch on the way down, then climbed back up and fell out again. It's the Leslie Nielsen of laptop ugliness.

Envy: 14 and 17

The Envy 14 and 17 are 14.5-inch and 17.3-inch widescreen laptops with Intel processors and ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5830 discrete graphics cards. They come with an HD webcam and audio software designed with Beats and Dr Dre.

The Envy 17 offers either Intel Dual Core i5 or Quad Core i7 processors, with up to 8GB of DDR3-1333 memory. Storage options are either dual 1TB hard-disk drives or dual 160GB solid-state drives.

The Envy 14 swaps a dollar sign for a pound sign, costing £1,000. The Envy 17 costs £1,299.

Pavilion: dm1, the dm3 and the dm4

The svelte Pavilion range welcomes three new entries: the dm1, the dm3 and the dm4. The top-end 14-inch Pavilion dm4 offers a choice of Intel Core processors and optional ATI Radeon HD5450 graphics chip. The dm3 and dm4 come with AMD Athlon II Neo or Turion II Neo chips. The dm1 starts at £400, the dm3 at £500 and the dm4 at £700.

The media-centric dv3, dv6 and dv7 are also new. The dv3 starts at £800, and the dv7 at £650. The new dv6 is the first Pavilion to pack a touchscreen, and will set you back from £550.

Mini: 210

The Mini range of netbooks sees some colour options for the Mini 210. It'll come in preppy pink, pictured above, or white crystal. The foul-looking pink version includes a fancy floating plaid imprint 3D effect in the lid -- it's horrendous. Meanwhile, the Mini 110 now includes an integrated six-cell battery that promises up to 8 hours of battery life.

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Laptops
About the author

Rich Trenholm is a senior editor at CNET where he covers everything from phones to bionic implants. Based in London since 2007, he has travelled the world seeking out the latest and best consumer technology for your enjoyment.

 

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