Google Nexus 4 delivery slips again to 2-3 weeks

Delivery of the Google Nexus 4 has slipped again: it could take two or three weeks before you get your hands on your new phone.

It was too good to last: delivery of the Google Nexus 4 has slipped again, and the Big G cautions it could take two or three weeks before you get your hands on your new Jelly Bean phone.

The oversubscribed Nexus 4 went back on sale at Google Play just last Wednesday, and already delivery times have been extended. Looks like those stock problems aren't going away for Google and the phone's manufacturer LG.

Still, the first people to get their orders in last week received their phone in less than 48 hours despite Google's initial estimates of a wait of one or two weeks. So perhaps the new extended delivery time is just precautionary and your phone will actually arrive sooner.

The Nexus 4 first went on sale in November last year, and sold out instantly. Since then it's been available only the odd day here and there. At one stage last year, Google warned that delivery could take six or seven weeks.

The erratic availability and elastic delivery times are signs of LG and Google's continuing stock woes as the Nexus 4 proves more popular than anticipated. Google claims supply has been all over the shop, while LG says Google massively underestimated potential demand. Still, even if delivery times are slipping, fingers crossed we won't see the phone sold out entirely any more.

The 8GB Nexus 4 costs £239, while the 16GB model costs £279, amazing value for a quad-core 4.7-inch smart phone with the latest Android 4.2 Jelly Bean software. You can buy two of each at a time.

Hit play on our video below to see why we awarded the Nexus 4 four stars -- and a coveted CNET Editors' Choice Award:


Have you bagged a Nexus 4? Is this a sign of more stock problems to come? Tell me your thoughts in the comments or on our Facebook page.

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