Google Glass gets a fashionable makeover

A look at one of the first redesigns of Glass that comes from Google itself and might actually make wearable tech stylish.

Glass marketing manager Amanda Rosenberg poses in a more fashion-forward version of the specs. Google

Lately, the Google Glass team seems to be working on remaking its image into something a little more chic.

We've already seen the Explorer edition of the wearable tech shown off as a fashion accessory at a Diane von Furstenberg show last year, and in the pages of Vogue's colossal September issue. But the above revision of Glass is among the first I've seen that was designed by the Google team and doesn't look like it was lifted from the pages of some old DC Comics.

The new design was posted on Isabelle Olsson's Google+ page a few weeks back. Olsson is the lead industrial designer on the Glass team who the New York Times recently described as "one of a group of women charged by the company with turning Glass into the next It accessory."

Olsson's design is certainly more stylish than the Explorer model and is surprisingly effective at hiding the normally garish protrusion of the Glass hardware, although not as much as this rendering that totally flattens Glass (and presumably isn't possible for Google to recreate at a reasonable cost at the moment).

Earlier this year there were rumblings that Google might want to bring hip eyeglass startup Warby Parker into the fold to jazz up Glass. Perhaps that is still a possibility, but clearly Google also has its own people already at work on the task of making Glass a little less Android and a lot more human.

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