Galaxy Gear 'lacks something special', Samsung admits

Samsung's first smart watch hasn't lived up to expectations, the company has admitted, and plans to invest more in its user interface.

Samsung's first smart watch hasn't lived up to expectations, the company has admitted, with the Galaxy Gear's lack of usability inspiring the Korean giant to hire more interface experts.

"We've acknowledged that our Gear lacks something special," an unnamed Samsung exec told the Korea Times. "With more investment for user interface and user experience, Samsung devices will be better in terms of customer satisfaction."

The Gear has barely gone on sale and already its maker is binning it like a burned omelette. Last week the company said it would have a second-generation Gear out early next year.

Samsung vice president Lee Young-hee tried to put a braver face on it, however. "It only weighs 74g and it's very easy to receive a call or text," he said.

At launch the £300 gadget only works with the new £600 Galaxy Note 3 phablet, the 5.7-inch behemoth that comes with a stylus. The idea is you don't want to haul that massive thing out of your pocket every time you get a notification, so you just glance at your wrist to see if it's worth it.

The Gear will be updated so it can work with the company's flagship Galaxy S4 next month, and last year's S3 and Note 2 by the end of the year, the company announced. The Gear currently has over 70 apps available for it, including eBay, Evernote and fitness app RunKeeper, with more promised.

My colleague Andy Hoyle is hard at work reviewing the Galaxy Gear -- as I write, he's yelling at his arm, "Text Nick. No, text Nick. Text Nick!" -- and we'll have a full review for you very soon.

Would you sport a smart watch on your wrist? What would you use it for most? How much would you spend on one? Keep things ticking over in the comments, or pass the time on our Facebook page.

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