Feds take health care open source

The "Connect" project uses open source to tie participants like the Defense and Veterans Affairs departments into the U.S. national health information network

President Obama has made transparency a hallmark of his presidency, with open source an integral part of this pledge. Obama has also expressed a desire to overhaul the U.S. health care system.

This week those two goals came together this week in Connect, "a(n open-source) gateway between multiple federal organizations and the proposed national health information network," according to Modern Healthcare.

The goal is to reduce the cost and complexity of tying into the U.S. national health information network, with three of the largest federal health care provider organizations, Defense and Veterans Affairs departments, plus the Indian Health Service, each participating in Connect. Connect will "tie together health information exchanges, integrated delivery networks, pharmacies, government health facilities and payors, labs, providers, private payors and other stakeholders into a 'network of networks,'" according to the project site.

Very ambitious, and dearly needed, given the myriad of silo-ed data sources in health care today.

The U.S. federal government has been actively consuming open source for years, but only recently has it actively sought to improve efficiency and lower costs by releasing open-source projects like those housed on the Department of Defense's Forge.mil site .

The times they are a changin'.


Follow me on Twitter @mjasay.

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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