Facebook 'like' the real world with Coca-Cola RFID swiper

Coke-crazed kids issued with RFID bracelets have been swiping and Facebook liking their real-world activities

When we showed our appreciation for our Facebook fans by bringing the 'like' button to the real world , we didn't expect a horde of Coca-Cola-crazed teenagers to go one better. The kids were issued with an RFID bracelet that allowed them to 'like' the things they were doing in the real world. Everything's better with RFID.

The scheme was thought up by the bafflingly named geniuses at Israeli marketing agency Publicis E-dologic. Visitors to the Coca-Cola Village Amusement Park, a three-day pop-up amusement park in Israel, were given RFID bracelets as they entered.

The radio frequency identification tags were programmed with their individual Facebook details, allowing them to swipe the bracelet on a special reader -- or 'like machine' -- to post a thumbs-up for that ride or activity on their online profile.

The bracelet also allowed the Coke-fuelled kids to swipe official photographers, thus uploading photos to Facebook with their faces automatically tagged. Hopped-up on sugar, caffeine and adolescent hormones, the 650 teenagers rampaging around the park made over 35,000 posts.

Once we got past our revulsion at the concept of a Coca-Cola Village we decided this is a great idea. It ties in with the 'Internet of things' -- yoking the Web to real-world activities and objects -- and  Facebook's new Places feature , which sees you check in with the social network to register where you're hangin' out.

Every venue could have a Facebook reader where you swipe your bracelet to check in and like what you're doing. Swipe to like! We could call it the Likelet. Or the DongleBangle. Or we could implant the Facebook chip inside our arms so Facebook knows where we are all the time.

Hmm -- too much? The comments section is below for thumbs-up or thumbs-downs. A giant no-prize to the first luddite who spouts that old chestnut about social-network users getting their houses burgled. Bonus points for referring to Facebook users as sheep, and a big wet lick on the face for anyone throwing in a hackneyed George Orwell reference. Like!

Tags:
Software
About the author

Rich Trenholm is a senior editor at CNET where he covers everything from phones to bionic implants. Based in London since 2007, he has travelled the world seeking out the latest and best consumer technology for your enjoyment.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

CNET's Christmas Gift Guide

'Tis the season for a gadget upgrade

Check out these 8 tablets you'll want to bring home for the holidays.