Facebook buys Storylane blog, to go with new News Feed

Facebook has snapped up a blogging site for sharing stories, just after unveiling its new-look News Feed.

Facebook has snapped up Storylane, a blogging site with a community feel that lets people share stories. The social networking behemoth has acquired the team behind the site, rather than the site itself, so if you've posted anything, rest assured, Zuckerberg won't get his mitts on it.

Jonathan Gheller, founder of Storylane, posted the news on the site, reassuring users that anything they'd shared wouldn't fall into Facebook's hands.

"The beautiful stories you have decided to share with us are yours to keep and share in however way you want," Gheller wrote. "We are building tools that will help you migrate the content to other services if you so desire. I will be in touch with you about those specific tools later, but I can confirm that Facebook is not acquiring any of your data; and we're working to make sure you can migrate your content in a manageable way."

Facebook just unveiled its new News Feed, which Mark Zuckerberg said should be like a "personalised newspaper" for each person. Obviously it's a bit late to integrate some of Storylane's features into it, but we could well see some built in at some point in the future. The new News Feed has bigger images -- a staple of Storylane -- and lets you customise it as you see fit. It's also designed to be more consistent across mobile devices and desktop browsers.

It's more of a mix too, with news articles, images, maps, photos, and the rest, much like Storylane, or a Pinterest board.

Storylane only launched last October. Yahoo was also reported to be interested in snapping it up. That seems the way to get rick quick, come up with a killer idea and sell it to Facebook or Apple.

So, any ideas? Shout up in the comments below, or on our Facebook page.

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