Cameron: Parents must take responsibility for Internet porn

David Cameron has rejected calls to revise sex education because of the Internet, and says it's down to the parents.

Prime Minister David Cameron reckons it's up to parents to stop their kids looking at indecent images online, he said in a speech on Friday.

He was reacting to Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg's proposed wholesale reform of the national curriculum on sex education, the Guardian reports. Cleggy reckons that it needs updating to keep up with the growth of Internet porn, but Cameron -- along with education secretary Michael Gove -- disagrees.

Cameron thinks we need to stay on top of the problems the Internet brings for the little 'uns, but it's up to the parents to stop them viewing unsuitable sites. "We need to make sure we are up to date on the problems of the Internet," Cameron said.

"Where I absolutely agree with the education secretary is that I am not looking for wholesale reform of the curriculum on sex education. We should be alert to those points and make those changes, but I don't think we need wholesale reform."

Cameron reckons teachers should still play their part, though. "We have all got to get involved [in educating the young about sex] because of the Internet," he said. "We all have to learn more about the Internet, the dangers of the Internet, the issue of access for children."

He added that we all need to "get better at understanding all these issues around parental controls", asking ourselves "what it is ok for children to access and when".

Cameron wants to clamp down on Internet porn, imposing an ' opt-in ' policy. Want to view grot online? You'll have to notify your ISP beforehand. That's " absolutely ridiculous ", according to Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales. Other critics have pointed out numerous problems with the scheme, such as: What qualifies as porn? Who decides that? How do you make sure legitimate sex education sites aren't included in the ban?

Also, Cameron might want to get his own house in order before he starts telling the rest of us what we can and can't look at.

Does sex education on the national curriculum need revising because of the Internet? Let me know in the comments, or on our Facebook page.

About the author

    Joe has been writing about consumer tech for nearly seven years now, but his liking for all things shiny goes back to the Gameboy he received aged eight (and that he still plays on at family gatherings, much to the annoyance of his parents). His pride and joy is an Infocus projector, whose 80-inch picture elevates movie nights to a whole new level.

     

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