<b>Microsoft Internet Explorer 3.0.1: problems and solutions

Microsoft Internet Explorer 3.0.1: problems and solutions

Previously, we posted some initial reports of problems with the recently released Microsoft Internet Explorer 3.0.1. Since then, several more issues have surfaced:

a. Java problems (and Text Encoding Converter) Many readers are reporting problems with the Java feature of MIE 3.0.1. For example, Cary Felbab writes that "anytime I go to a page with Java in it, the program crashes when trying to start the Java applet. This did not occur in the beta version of 3.0.1."
Doug DeMoss similarly writes that MIE 3.0.1 crashed every time it tried to start a Java applet. The good news is that Doug claims to have determined the cause: the Text Encoding Converter extension installed with Cyberdog 2.0b1. He disabled it and the crashes disappeared.

Update: Kevin McKay reports that increasing Explorer's memory to 8MB solved his Java problem.

b. 3.0 vs. 3.0.1 MIE extensions Howard Chansky was having problems running MIE 3.0.1. He eventually traced them to the fact that versions 3.0 and 3.0.1 appear to install "mutually incompatible extensions. When I removed a MIE 3.0-specific extension (jgdw.ppc) the new version 3.0.1 worked fine. Similarly, version 3.0 would only work when I removed 3.0.1-specific extensions." The Remove option does not remove the problem extensions (an issue noted here last time), so you must find them and remove them manually.

c. ImagePlayer Reader Francis claims that the cause of system crashes he was having when using MIE 3.0.x was a shared library file called ImagePlayerFat (initially appearing as a binhex file called ImagePlayer.hqx) that comes with the MIE. Whenever it was accessed, a system crash occurred.

Update: Reader Jason reports: "ImagePlayer.hqx is a .hqx file that contains a shared library file, ImagePlayerFat, for Internet News and Mail. This shared library allows users the option of viewing images inside messages. For the shared library to work you first must un-hqx it and place it in the proper folder: Preference Panels."

d. MIE glitch with Internet Config Dana Nau writes: "Internet Explorer doesn't use the Internet Preferences file in the manner in which it was intended to be used. Peter Lewis's Internet Config documentation clearly states that if a copy of the Internet Preferences file is located in the same folder as an app that supports Internet Config, the app should use this local copy of the Internet Preferences file rather than the one in the Preferences folder. However, Internet Explorer doesn't do this. If you put a copy of Internet Preferences in the Explorer folder, Internet Explorer ignores it and uses the copy in the Preferences folder instead. This makes it impossible for different users to have alternate configurations of Internet Explorer." (see also previous item on Internet Config.)

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