Athletic gear cools you down with your own sweat

Mission's proprietary athletic fabric amplifies your sweat power at the fiber level, claiming a 30-degree drop compared to body temperature.

Reggie Bush and George St-Pierre
Reggie Bush and George St-Pierre model Mission cooling products. Mission

Our sweat plays an important role in regulating body temperature. For athletes who get into really intense workouts or who have to perform in hot climates, it would be a dream come true to be able to amplify the cooling power of their own sweat. In a way, athletic gear company Mission has figured out how to do just that.

There are lots of technical fabrics and cooling solutions on the market, ranging from those kerchiefs you buy at the state fair and soak with water to wear around your neck, to shirts that wick moisture away from your skin. Mission creates towels, arm sleeves, helmet liners, hoodies, and skull caps. That all sounds pretty standard, but what makes it a bit different is the high-tech fabric involved.

Every fancy fabric needs an impressive name. Mission went with "EnduraCool" with "Coolcore" technology. What that translates to is fibers with hollow cores that absorb moisture. Snapping the cloth allows air to flow around the fibers. The water then very slowly evaporates from the fibers, giving off a cooling effect that is easy to reactivate. Just keep sweating.

The company claims it can drop the fabric's temperature up to 30 degrees below average body temperature. The technology is not so much fancy as it is clever. The best part, really, is that you can use your own sweat to activate the fibers. Sure, you could pour water on it, but it's much more macho to use your own hard-earned sweat.

Prices for the Mission products range from $14.99 for a towel, up to $43.99 for arm sleeves. As the weather heats up, athletes will look for any way they can to keep cool and still perform at a high level. Mission may be one more competitor in a crowded athletic gear market, but it's an interesting one.

About the author

Freelance writer Amanda C. Kooser covers gadgets and tech news with a twist for CNET's Crave blog. When not wallowing in weird gadgets and iPad apps for cats, she can be found tinkering with her 1956 DeSoto.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

How well do you know your surge protector?

Whether you're looking to add more outlets, or want to add a layer of protection between your gear and the outside world, here's what you need to know.