Asus crafting Intel-powered Nexus 7-alike, reports say

Asus is reportedly crafting a new 7-inch tablet, built out of aluminium.

Riding high on the success of its 7-inch Nexus 7 tablet , Asus is rumoured to be cooking up a new device, this time powered by an Intel processor.

Word of the mysterious tablet surfaced on Bulgarian site tablet.bg, pegging the tablet to have a 7-inch 1,280x800 pixel resolution, just like the Nexus 7. The device -- which apparently has the model number ME371MG -- is slated to sport 1GB of RAM and run Android 4.1 Jelly Bean .

So far, so bog standard. The elusive gadget is tipped to outshine the Nexus 7 on two counts though, reportedly offering a 3-megapixel camera and a microSD card slot -- both features that elude the current Google-branded device.

The tablet is supposedly constructed from aluminium, as you can see in the leaked snap above. The site claims the tablet will be 'ultra-budget', so fingers crossed for a price tag to match the £160 Nexus 7.

Intel is trying to get its chips inside as many smart phones and tablets as possible, to combat rival chip-builders like ARM.

We've seen the silicon-addled company stuffing its processors inside several smart phones over the last year or so, including the Orange San Diego and the Motorola Razr i.

While both those devices are workmanlike mobiles, neither set our hearts aflame like the Nexus 4, Samsung Galaxy S3 or iPhone 5. If Intel wants to stake a claim, it'll need to be seen powering a top-tier gadget.

A follow-up to the Nexus 7 wouldn't be a bad mast for Intel to nail its colours to. As always, take these unconfirmed reports with a pinch of salt, but if this tablet is in the works, there's a good chance we'll see it revealed at Mobile World Congress in a few weeks' time.

Would you be keen on an Intel powered tablet? Let me know in the comments, or on our Facebook wall.

Image credit: Tablet.bg

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Looking for an affordable tablet?

CNET rounds up high-quality tablets that won't break your wallet.