Apple seeks to take over domain name

Apple has filed a claim with the World Intellectual Property Organisation seeking to gain control of the domain.

Apple naming the latest iPad just "the new iPad" has set off a flurry of rumours about what it'll call the next iPhone. Well this could be a hint -- the Cupertino company has filed a claim with the World Intellectual Property Organisation, seeking to gain control of the domain name, Mac Rumors reports.

Previously Apple has been slower to act on knockoff websites. It didn't gain control of until almost a year after that handset launched, and didn't become the subject of Apple's attention until a few weeks after the 4S was announced. (In that case the site was forwarding visitors to porn sites though, so it could be a case of Apple jumping on to stop anything similar happening.)

Head to at the moment and all you'll see is a series of discussions concerning the upcoming handset. It was set up in October 2010, not long after the iPhone 4 launched.

The iPad naming did cast doubts on Apple calling its next handset iPhone 5. When it refreshes its computers or iPod line, it saves new names for a completely new product, after all. And it's likely it wants to avoid high numbers after the product name, as that would make the device seem old. Film franchises do the same, with The Final Destination, Rambo, and Rocky Balboa handily avoiding numerals which would highlight how tired the various series have become.

The latest rumours say the next iPhone will feature a 4-inch screen and new dock connector. Samsung has gone big with its rival, the Galaxy S3, slapping a 4.8-inch screen on it. But the battle for the smart phone crown is about a lot more than just size.

What would you like to see from the next iPhone? And what would you call it? Let me know in the comments, or on our Facebook page.

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