Apple kills clickwheel games, R.I.P. iPod Classic?

Apple has removed clickwheel games from iTunes, fanning the flames of rumours that the iPod Classic's time could be up.

We've brought you rumours Apple was killing the iPod Classic before, but now we've more reason to believe it's true. Apple has removed an entire section of games from iTunes dedicated to be played with the clickwheel.

The drop-down menu on iTunes used to have an option entitled "iPod clickwheel games," but now it's mysteriously vanished, reports AppleInsider. Could these be the last days of the iconic iPod design?

Apple has an event scheduled for Tuesday, and while all eyes are on the iPhone, this is traditionally the time of year it refreshes its iPod line. (It is coming up to Christmas after all, though you wouldn't know it from this sweltering weather.) And yesterday we brought you renewed rumours Apple was planning to kill off the iPod Shuffle and the iPod Classic, so this would all tally.

Of course Apple could just be retiring games on the Classic, choosing to focus on the far more versatile iPod Touch.

It'd be a shame if Apple did kill off the Classic, though 10 years is a long time for any device to be around. The Classic features the same look as the original iPod launched back in 2001, though the original clickwheel actually turned. The first iPod also featured four buttons before Apple refined it and integrated the functionality into the wheel.

Apple has been focussing less and less on the Classic in recent years, and while we don't have access to sales figures, we can imagine it paling in comparison to Apple's more innovative players.

Have a look at our complete history of the iPod to twang your nostalgia strings. Would you mourn the Classic's passing? Let us know on our Facebook page.

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