Apple changes a name that could change repair policies

Apple has changed the name of one of the key components used to determine whether or not damage was caused by liquid submersion. Though the change is subtle, now the Liquid Contact Indicator, it could signal a change in Apple's repair policies.

Apple has changed the name of one of the key components used to determine whether or not damage was caused by liquid submersion. Though the change is subtle, now the Liquid Contact Indicator, it could signal a change in Apple's repair policies.

Formally the Liquid Submersion Indicator, a sensor that is meant to determine if the device (now on iPhones, iPods, and iPads) has been immersed in liquid, has been the subject of many consumer complaints saying the indicator was not accurate in particular climates.

When I worked in Apple Retail, as part of the original iPhone launch, we were told that the Liquid Immersion Indicator was 100 percent accurate as tested by Apple's engineers. Of course we were faced, soon after the launch, with many customers that claimed the indicator was tripped despite never having been immersed.

The new name, Liquid Contact Indicator, suggests Apple has found that indeed, the sensor could be triggered by accident, instead of as a result of the device being in liquid.

How does this relate to you? Reports suggest that especially in climates where humidity is heavy and consistent, the sensor could fail, indicating that the consumer would be at-fault for damage to the device.

By changing the name of the sensor, Apple has quite a bit more wiggle room when dealing with customer service issues regarding liquid damage. Guidelines should be relaxed with respect to any liquid-related incidents. Now, a more detailed inspection will be required to determine fault.

If you have previously taken your device in to Apple and had a free repair rejected based on the (former) Liquid Submersion Indicator (as long as you did not actually drop the device in water and only one of those indicators was tripped), it might be worth making your case to Apple again.

Is this a sign that Apple is more in touch with its customers regarding repairs? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

 

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