Apple battery patent could mean thinner devices

Apple is trying to patent a space-saving battery that could mean thinner iPhones and iPads. Read on for the skinny.

An Apple patent application describes a new, space-saving battery design that could lead to thinner devices. Read on for the skinny. Ahem.

Apple's slender new battery tech involves a "set of electrode sheets of different dimensions", according to Patently Apple. Those sheets can be stacked on top of each other to make various shapes in order to save space. A cone shape, an L-shaped space or a triangle, for example -- a bit like battery Tetris.

One drawing shows how batteries could be squirrelled behind the iPad's curved edges. That leaves more space in the middle for other exciting hardware.

Breaking free from boring rectangular batteries means gadgets themselves could have weirder shapes. So perhaps we could see a tablet or smart phone that's curved like a semicircle. We're not sure what the point would be, but y'know, progress.

To be honest, we're just relieved to see Apple doing something about batteries, even if it's just finding exciting new shapes for them. It's no secret the humble battery is lagging behind other technologies -- we'd like something capable of holding a bit more juice so we don't have to charge our mobiles ten times a day.

For now though, anything that could make gadgetry a smidge thinner is alright in our book. Here's hoping these oddly-shaped batteries make their way into our tech before too long.

How long does the battery last on your phone? Tell us in the comments, or on our Facebook wall.

Image credit: Patently Apple

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About the author

Luke Westaway is a senior editor at CNET and writer/ presenter of Adventures in Tech, a thrilling gadget show produced in our London office. Luke's focus is on keeping you in the loop with a mix of video, features, expert opinion and analysis.

 

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