Anonymous lashes out at Norway massacre suspect

Dubbed Operation UnManifest, the hactivist network's latest campaign is aimed at discrediting the manifesto of Anders Behring Breivik, accused of murdering dozens of people in Norway last week.

The man accused of the attacks in Norway last Friday that left dozens of people dead is the latest target of the "hacktivist" group Anonymous.

In an attempt to discredit the manifesto of accused murderer Anders Behring Breivik, Anonymous has unveiled its own campaign known as Operation UnManifest. The hactivist group's latest action is aimed at hacking into and modifying Breivik's "European Declaration of Independence" with the goal of republishing fake editions of the so-called manifesto everywhere online, thus turning Anders into a "joke."

As part of Operation UnManifest, Anonymous also is calling for "a moment for the victims of his cruel attacks."

Lance Whitney/CNET

Breivik is accused of a bombing in Oslo last Friday, which he followed up with a shooting spree on the nearby island of Utoya that targeted youth attending a summer camp organized by the youth wing of the ruling Labor Party. The bombing killed eight people, while the attack on the youth camp resulted in 68 dead, according to CBS News, which said the government lowered the total number of dead from more than 90 initially.

The attack has been described as the most violent day in Norway since World War II .

As justification, or what he called a "marketing campaign," for his actions, Breivik has cited a 1,500-page manifesto that he wrote aimed at ridding Europe of Muslims. The suspect's "2083 - European Declaration of Independence" calls for a revolution with guerrilla tactics and executions designed to keep Europe from Muslims.

"When I speak, I speak on behalf of millions of Europeans who do not want to see their culture and territorial rights taken from them, who do not want to live under current or future dhimmitude and who do not accept that their own leaders are selling them against their will to Islamic slavery," said one passage of the manifesto quoted by CBS News.

Though Breivik has admitted to carrying out the attacks, he pleaded not guilty in a court appearance today.

About the author

Journalist, software trainer, and Web developer Lance Whitney writes columns and reviews for CNET, Computer Shopper, Microsoft TechNet, and other technology sites. His first book, "Windows 8 Five Minutes at a Time," was published by Wiley & Sons in November 2012.

 

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