Amazon yanks Kindle Touch ahead of launch event

Amazon could be 'doing an Apple', pulling both models ahead of an update.

Here's an interesting development: Amazon has yanked both models of Kindle Touch from its US site, The Verge reports. We already know that the online retail giant has a big press event planned for 6 September, so could an update be on the cards?

We're expecting a sequel to the Kindle Fire Android tablet at the September event, but the fact both the Wi-Fi and 3G models of Kindle Touch have disappeared makes me think Amazon is cooking up something else. Both models are listed as "currently unavailable" with prospective buyers being told: "we don't know when or if this item will be back in stock."

Now I know we're coming to the end of the summer holidays, but still, I can't see Amazon running out of stock of both devices unless it's planning on refreshing the lineup.

We Brits can still buy both models though, which hints that maybe we'll be left out of the bookish love-in come 6 September. Seriously, if that is the case I think I might flip a table. We still can't buy the Kindle Fire in the UK, so if Amazon does launch a sequel, and updates the Kindle Touch while omitting us Bits, well, that's taking the mickey somewhat.

Amazon did sneak its Cloud Drive storage system onto these shores without telling anyone though, so it could be planning some UK-specific announcements. Let's hope so anyway.

The Kindle Fire 2 is said to be thinner, lighter, and have a rear-facing camera. The screen could also match the Nexus 7's resolution of 1,280x800 pixels. Amazon could well be worried by the success of the Nexus 7, which would be all the more reason to bring the Kindle Fire to the UK, in my opinion.

Do you think the Kindle Touch will be updated? And will we be left out? Let me know in the comments, or on Facebook.

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