Adobe's Photoshop Express gets printing, desktop uploader

Photoshop Express gets some small but useful updates. Heavy photo editing users will still be likely to find more from competing services.

Adobe just updated its Photoshop Express service with a handful of relatively unexciting but useful new features. The most important one is the inclusion of printing through Shutterfly, making it easier to take edited photos and get them printed either for yourself or to send as gifts. Previously you'd have to pull down the photos off of Adobe's servers or send them to a partner server to have them printed elsewhere. Now you can just get them ported out with a single click.

There's also a new Adobe AIR uploader that lets you send photos from your desktop to Photoshop Express' cloud storage servers for editing with a simple drag and drop. Between the Web and desktop uploader, I actually found the Web version just a tad slower, although both are exceptionally easy to use. Either way you're still stuck with Adobe's 2GB account cap. The good news is that you can now shrink exceptionally large photos with the new resizing tool that gives you some quick presets for popular formats--mainly blogs and social-networking profile photos.

Another update of interest is the inclusion of music for use in slideshows. A similar offering showed up in Adobe's Flex-based editing tool for videos (coverage) and lets you put your creation to rights managed tracks. I couldn't manage to get any of the songs to show up, but the drop down menu can be found alongside the other settings when you're in the slideshow editing environment.

Photoshop Express' latest major update included integration with Flickr and several other social photo sharing sites.

Adobe's AIR uploader lets you drag and drop photos from your desktop to upload to Photoshop Express. CNET Networks
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