9,000 O2 customers face porn company money shot

Ben Dover Productions has been given the go-ahead to demand compensation from 9,000 O2 customers suspected of illegally downloading porn.

If you've been a naughty boy, something's about to fill your slot that'll leave you moaning. A letter, that is, from porn-peddler Ben Dover, demanding compensation if you're suspected of pirating adult movies.

British adult entertainment company Ben Dover Productions, also known as Golden Eye International, is tossing off letters to the users of 9,124 IP addresses on O2, accusing them of illegally downloading blue movies and begging to be satisfied.

The porn company won a court order in March that forced O2 to shoot over the details of customers who may have downloaded pirated copies of its films.

The smut-mongers will now write to the people associated with those IP addresses, after the High Court has approved the intended text of the letter. A judge toned down the language of the first letter, which the company says will "seek to find out more information regarding evidence of an infringement of our copyright."

The judge blocked the company from threatening users that O2 would "slow down or terminate your internet connection." Golden Eye was also banned from demanding a £700 money shot from each user. Instead, each user has the opportunity to dispute the claim, as the court acknowledges that an IP address cannot necessarily be tied to a person.

If they admit it, users must individually negotiate a settlement. And if they do not respond within 28 days, they could be found liable, which would be quite a blow.

The company claims it's been pounded hard by piracy -- harder even than mainstream movies, because pirates cannot replicate the cinematic experience. The company is also chasing websites that it argues encourage online piracy, as well as pirates of physical DVDs.

Is this the right way to address piracy, whether of porn or any other types of movie and media? Go down in the comments and tell me your thoughts, or come hither to our Facebook page.

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About the author

Rich Trenholm is a senior editor at CNET where he covers everything from phones to bionic implants. Based in London since 2007, he has travelled the world seeking out the latest and best consumer technology for your enjoyment.

 

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