"8-track" hydrogen cartridge for cars

Critics of fuel-cell cars point to the dangers of storing hydrogen in a vehicle. FST Energy gets around this problem by storing hydrogen in an absorbent material that is contained in a cartridge.

FST energy's DC3 hydrogen cassette system.
The FST hydrogen system fills cartridges to power fuel-cell cars. FST Energy

Critics of fuel-cell cars often point to the dangers of storing hydrogen in a vehicle. FST Energy gets around this problem by storing hydrogen in an absorbent material that is contained in a cartridge. (Actually, the company calls it the FST Fuel Cassette, but cartridge works better with our 8-track reference.) Anyway, FST's cartridge would hold some sort of catalyst that could absorb and release hydrogen molecules. When you drive up to a fuel station in your fuel-cell car, instead of connecting up a hose, you'd pull out your car's empty cartridge and exchange it for a full one.

But wait, FST has another trick up its sleeve. Its DC3 stack includes an electrolyzer that splits water into oxygen and hydrogen. You could plug it in overnight, and have a full hydrogen cartridge in the morning. Now, if FST Energy could strike a deal with the music industry, we could plug a Doobie Brothers hydrogen cartridge into our car and be Rockin' Down the Highway.

About the author

Wayne Cunningham reviews cars and writes about automotive technology for CNET. Prior to the Car Tech beat, he covered spyware, Web building technologies, and computer hardware. He began covering technology and the Web in 1994 as an editor of The Net magazine. He's also the author of "Vaporware," a novel that's available as a Nook e-book.

 

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