1 million Raspberry Pi computers have been sold

The computer that makes us all engineers has sold about a million units, the company said on its blog.

Raspberry Pi -- the little computer that's bringing back engineering in a big way -- has sold about a million units. The numbers aren't concrete, but estimates peg the total at about the million figure. Which is quite some achievement.

And to celebrate, the folks who make the mini computer have put together the infographic you can see above.

"The folks at 14/Premier Farnell announced today that they alone have now made and sold more than half a million Raspberry Pis," it says on the Raspberry Pi blog. "They're only one of two official distributors; we don't have completely up-to-date figures from RS Components yet, but Farnell's news suggests that we're well on the way to having sold our millionth Raspberry Pi."

To give you an idea of exactly how much tech I'm talking about, the half a million Pis made by 14/Premier Farnell would weigh the same as 169,173 Nokia 3310s (remember those?), or 200,893 iPhone 5s. All of them stacked end to end would be taller than 11 Empire State Buildings, and higher than Felix Baumgartner's world record skydive of 128,000 feet. Laid end to end, they'd be the same length as 5,070 double-decker buses. And at a cost of $17.5 million (£10.8 million), customers could've bought 4,375,000 chocolate bars. But then a Raspberry Pi is far better for you.

The Raspberry Pi was one of the best tech stories of last year, and a real triumph of British engineering. Our very own Katie Collins voted it her product of the year , as it helps today's school kids get tinkering with tech. The Pi even has its own app store , so you can easily snaffle games and software. The app store has a 'tip jar' too, so you can donate some funds even if your chosen app is free, which is a great idea.

Have you bought a Raspberry Pi? What are you using yours for? Let me know in the comments, or on our Facebook page.

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About the author

    Joe has been writing about consumer tech for nearly seven years now, but his liking for all things shiny goes back to the Gameboy he received aged eight (and that he still plays on at family gatherings, much to the annoyance of his parents). His pride and joy is an Infocus projector, whose 80-inch picture elevates movie nights to a whole new level.

     

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