How to use turn-by-turn navigation in iOS 6

Having dropped Google's Maps like a hot potato, Apple's brought its own take on turn-by-turn navigation to iOS 6. Here's what to expect.

The biggest new iPhone feature announced at Apple's WWDC keynote this week was a brand-new Maps application, which Apple has built with TomTom, discarding Google Maps like a kebab box hurled from a taxi.

Thanks to screenshots sent to us by an anonymous tipster, we've been able to take a closer look at these new navigation features and see what it will be like to use when iOS 6 comes out in a few months' time.

iOS 6 navigation input

To start navigation, you tap the navigation button in the top-left corner of the screen while in the Maps app, and put in a destination. The default starting point will always be your current location.

iOS 6 navigation select route

Like the previous version of Maps, you can then choose from multiple routes and select Start to begin navigating. This works worldwide.

iOS 6 navigation traffic

Thanks to TomTom integration and crowd-sourced traffic updates, your ETA will be fairly accurate as you progress through your journey. The app can also suggest alternate routes you could take to avoid any heavy traffic that may be ahead.

iOS 6 3D US UK comparison

While navigating, you can toggle 3D mode on and off to take in some virtual sites -- but there are currently very few (if any) in the UK, with obvious contenders like Big Ben as flat as pancakes. While this Flyover feature looks very impressive in US cities, in the UK it's currently useless, although that may change by the time iOS 6 launches properly.

iOS 6 navigation list

You can also see an overview of your route, or a list view of all the turns that you have to make.

iOS 6 navigation map

The iPhone 4S and new iPad will have Siri talking you through each turn you have to make, just like a standard sat-nav, so you don't have to take your eyes off the road to glance at your phone screen on the dashboard. As Siri isn't available on older models, those with an iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4 or iPad 2 will need the help of a backseat driver to navigate to their destination.

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About the author

    John Thompson has been addicted to technology ever since he tinkered with his custom built PC when he was 10 years old. He has been the proud owner of seven Amazon Kindles, but only because he accidentally destroyed the first six. John is a freelance journalist and is not an employee of CNET.

     

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