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See where 26 asteroids smacked Earth with A-bomb force

The B612 Foundation highlights the fact that asteroids come a-knockin' 3 to 10 times more frequently than previously thought. But don't freak out; most explode too high up to cause damage on the ground.

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For Earth Day, NASA wants you to take a 'global selfie'

Celebrating Earth Day? NASA suggests you snap a selfie outside, in a chair, or up in the air to celebrate all that nature has to offer.

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3D printing solves watery-ketchup conundrum

Two high school students create the ketchup-dispensing invention the world's been waiting for.

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'Cannabis Chemistry' explains the why behind the high

A new video from the American Chemical Society examines the science behind getting high and how some labs are working to prevent "killer" buzzes.

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Only 20 percent of Americans surveyed believe in Big Bang

Scientists express dismay at an Associated Press/GfK survey that suggests skepticism of science is still strong. Only 20 percent of Americans believe in the Big Bang. Less than one-third of Americans said they thought climate change was real.

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Powdered alcohol approved (hiccup or hooray?)

In a decision that some might deem surprising, the Treasury Department has approved a patent for a product called Palcolhol, a powdered form of vodka and other drinks. And yes, you just add water.

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Eggbeater-like device could bust bladder blood clots

Rice university students create the “clot slayer,” an elegantly simple device that could help doctors go fishing for potentially life-threatening blood clots.

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In Palau, lost WWII graves and unexploded bombs (pictures)

For years, BentProp Project volunteers have been seeking the remains of POWs and others executed by the Japanese. And NGO Cleared Ground Demining has been removing bombs from the area.

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The high-tech hunt for WWII MIAs (pictures)

Thanks to some very high-tech tools being used in the hunt for American military planes shot down by the Japanese in near the island nation of Palau in 1944, some families will finally be learning the fate of their lost loved ones. CNET traveled to Palau to document the hunt.

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To find lost jungle graves, beware of unexploded WWII bombs

The BentProp Project has been searching the Palauan jungle for years to find the remains of POWs and others executed by the Japanese. Unexploded WWII bombs make it a risky quest.

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The cutting-edge tech behind the hunt for lost WWII planes

For years, the BentProp Project has searched the seas off Palau for missing planes shot down by the Japanese. Now the group has access to the latest oceanographic technology, which it used to find two aircraft lost for 70 years.

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How BentProp and undersea robots found long-lost WWII bombers

Hundreds of families of Americans missing in action in Palau since World War II have long wondered what happened to their loved ones. Now cutting-edge oceanographic technology is helping find answers.

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