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Geeks tend to be Democrats, says DeGrasse Tyson

The "Cosmos" presenter and astrophysicist muses that Republicans are desperate to attract the nerd set.

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How the Internet of Things knows where gunfire happens

SST's ShotSpotter pinpoints outdoor, urban gunshots for law enforcement agencies. Now it's moving indoors with a service for schools.

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Solar storm almost fried Earth's electronics two years ago?

A fascinating NASA presentation suggests that in July 2012 Earth was one week away from being struck by a massive solar storm that would have had devastating effects. Can this be?

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The great Boeing metal-airplane shop (pictures)

Spirit Aerosystems in Wichita, Kan. manufactures both composite and aluminum fuselage sections for Boeing jets. Today, CNET Road Trip takes a look at the metal side of the shop.

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circa 1917:  Germans testing the climbing powers of captured British tanks, redecorated in German colours.  (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)

How tech innovation was used for mass killing during WWI

The conflict's start on July 28, 1914, signaled the beginning of a new era in high-tech warfare, which included fighter aircraft, tanks, chemical weapons, and flamethrowers.

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circa 1914:  The L2, a German naval zeppelin during World War I.  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Capturing history: a look at tech inventions during WWI (pictures)

Getty Images digitizes tens of thousands of images from the Great War, which show everything from aircraft locked in aerial combat to the first torpedo launches.

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Despite tornadoes and derailments, the 737s keep on coming

Every month, Spirit Aerosystems in Wichita, Kan., turns out 42 fuselages for 737s. And it's survived a disaster or two. CNET Road Trip 2014 stops by.

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Microsoft explains quantum computing so even you can understand

Quantum computing may someday blow away today's smartest machines. It's weird and heavy on the physics, but Microsoft thinks you can handle it.

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...this? And if they did, would they recall their history books -- er, data sets -- and fondly remember Kepler?
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(This, of course, is a memorable scene from 1977's "Star Wars," depicting Luke Skywalker on his home planet of Tatooine.)
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Even Tatooine feels the heat from climate change

The inaugural report from the Tatooine Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change presents unique climate challenges ahead for Sarlaacs, Hutts, and moisture farmers.

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Smart seat belt could alert dozy drivers

An EU-funded consortium is working to create sensors that would integrate with seat belts and seat covers to alert drivers when they get sleepy.

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IBM's Watson helps military members go back to civilian life

Big Blue's 'Jeopardy'-winning computer now comes in the form of an app that uses its technical know-how to assist military personnel in transitioning to life back home.

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Tesla's gigafactory could make electric cars rival gas cars

The massive lithium-ion battery plant is slated to open in 2017 and is said to bring down the battery cost per kWh by 30 percent.

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