SOPA

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The 404 1,475: Where we play a game of drones (podcast)

We're back at it with another show rundown! Today we're talking about Atari finally digging up those lost ET cartridges, unearthing a floppy disk containing all of Andy Warhol's digital art works, jamming cellphones on your work commute, drone photography trends, and a eulogy for Twitter.

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The organization Restore the Fourth is organizing anti-NSA street protests across the U.S.

Reddit, Mozilla, EFF and more join July 4th anti-NSA protests

To protest the NSA spying program on Independence Day, dozens of top Web sites will display a Fourth Amendment banner, and thousands of people will participate in street protests across the country.

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The film's producers say "War for the Web" features the last known extensive interview with activist Aaron Swartz, who committed suicide before his criminal trial was due to begin.

Film 'War for Web' warns of CISPA, SOPA, future threats

The late Aaron Swartz said in an interview for the documentary film, set to be completed late this year, that he was more worried about the U.S. government than about teenage hackers in basements.

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Not everyone was blowing kisses at the Sims 3 launch.

EA the worst company in America? Again?

Electronic Arts COO attempts to express understanding of why his company is again in the Final Four of the Consumerist's Worst Company awards. Is the company really so bad?

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Advocacy groups backing "Aaron's Law" are asking Rep. Bob Goodlatte (left) and Rep. John Conyers not to veer in the other direction and make federal hacking laws even more Draconian, which a new proposal would do.

'Aaron's Law' rewrite backfires, reformers now on defensive

Congressional sausage-making in Washington threatens to rewrite a controversial anti-hacking law used against the late Aaron Swartz -- by replacing it with an even more Draconian version.

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European Parliament in Strasbourg, France

EU to vote on porn ban, calls for Internet enforcement

In a severe threat to online freedoms in the region, the European Parliament is set to vote in the next week on "a ban on all forms of pornography in the media."

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Peter Eckersley, the Electronic Frontier Foundation's technology projects director and Aaron Swartz's former roommate, speaks at a gathering in San Francisco.

Senator disputes Aaron Swartz's SOPA, Protect IP role

Senate Judiciary spokeswoman denies that a meeting between a committee aide and the late activist Aaron Swartz led to the creation of the anti-SOPA advocacy group Demand Progress.

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Peter Eckersley, the Electronic Frontier Foundation's technology projects director and Aaron Swartz's former roommate, speaks at a gathering in San Francisco.

How Aaron Swartz helped to defeat Hollywood on SOPA

Aaron Swartz's former roommate, Peter Eckersley, says the late activist started Demand Progress because from D.C.'s perspective, it "doesn't matter" if their laws break the Internet.

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Unlike so many tech execs who play the role of shrinking violet when there's even a whiff of political controversy, Google co-founder Sergey Brin was among the most vocal executives on the front lines criticizing SOPA (and PIPA), which he <a href="https://plus.google.com/u/0/+SergeyBrin/posts/Dt6FoRv6hXJ">likened to Internet censorship</a> practiced by the likes of Iran and China.  "I am shocked that our lawmakers would contemplate such measures that would put us on a par with the most oppressive nations in the world," Brin wrote at the time. (See <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-57564637-38/">related story</a> about what SOPA's backers now think, one year later.)

The faces of those who fought SOPA (pictures)

Some of the key figures from the worlds of computer science, business and politics who came together to defeat the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act.

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After a year in the grave, can SOPA and Protect IP return?

CNET asked the leaders of the congressional committees that write U.S. copyright law, plus the groups that backed the controversial legislation a year ago, to tell us what will happen next.

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Policy and privacy: Five reasons why 2012 mattered

It was the year of Internet activism with a sharp political point: Protests derailed the Stop Online Piracy Act, assisted in imploding a United Nations summit, and helped to postpone a data-sharing bill.

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Web media: The 5 biggest stories of 2012

There wasn't much difference between 2011 and 2012 for online entertainment, with both years being rather lackluster. But there's no question that 2012 offered far more controversy and conflict.

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