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Have you ever wondered who pioneered the Internet land grab? In the mid-1980s, these leading-edge companies were the first to register .com addresses. But where are they now? Some are stronger than ever; some have been bought and sold; and others just host ads. 
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It was in March 1985 that the oldest domain was registered. The domain, www.symbolics.com, was owned by Symbolics, a now-defunct company that at the time was a leading software-development firm. Its domain was registered on March 15, 1985.
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Back then, there were only five commercial domains, period: BNN.com, Think.com, MCC.com, DEC.com, and Symbolics.com. Now, almost 30 years later, there are more than <a href="http://www.verisigninc.com/en_US/innovation/dnib/index.xhtml" >250 million</a> domain names in existence.
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Where are those first domains now? Let's take a look.

The first Net domains -- where are they now? (pictures)

CNET takes a look at the pioneers of the Internet domain-name land grab, and what their place is now on today's Web.

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NASA asks citizen scientists to become ‘asteroid hunters’

In an effort to avoid a potential apocalypse, the space agency is holding a contest to get people to help it discover deadly asteroids.

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This series of images from the Hubble Space Telescope shows an asteroid coming apart, likely from forces applied to it by sunlight.

Asteroid breaks up just like in Atari game

A phenomenon known as "YORP torque" is ripping an asteroid apart, and thanks to a team of telescopes, astronomers have been able to watch for the first time ever.

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This evening, to celebrate the best visual effects Oscar for "Gravity," NASA put up a <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/sets/72157641720644305/">gallery of photographs</a> that could easily have been inspiration for the hit film.
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In this 1984 image, NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless II, was photographed further away from his space ship than any other astronaut in history. He was able to do so thanks to the Manned Manuevering Unit or MMU, a nitrogen jet propelled backpack. He was 320 feet from the Challenger orbiter.

NASA's real 'Gravity' photos

In honor of "Gravity" winning the Oscar for best visual effects, the American space agency posted a gallery of many shots that could have inspired the hit film.

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Internet pop culture with snarky commentary.

Ep. 1424: Where we say Good Night to you

404 all-star Dr. Michael Breus is back on the show today to talk about his new insomnia app, Good Night, and to answer questions about our listener's freakish sleep oddities.

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O2 4G kicks off free Premier League goals from The Sun

Sign up to O2 4G and you can watch a flood of top-flight football on your phone thanks to the super-soaraway Sun.

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We walk you through some of the fitness gadgets at CES 2014, starting with a bed that can stop your partner snoring, and ending in a high-tech sauna.

Smart bed and more in CES heath-tech tour

We walk you through some of the fitness gadgets at CES 2014, starting with a bed that can stop your partner snoring, and ending in a high-tech sauna.

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The cars of the future may be able to communicate with each other, drive 
themselves, and be powered by the sun. CNET's Sumi Das on the concepts 
and the cars that automakers showed off at the Consumer Electronics Show in 
Las Vegas.

CES: Cars that are solar-powered, talk to each other, and don't need drivers

The cars of the future may be able to communicate with each other, drive themselves, and be powered by the sun. CNET's Sumi Das on the concepts and the cars that automakers showed off at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

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We recap the biggest stories from day one at CES 2014, a hands-on look with Roku TV, and Brian Tong's first ever "C-E-Yes or C-E-No"

CES in Depth: The big announcements from Press Day at CES 2014

We recap the biggest stories from day one at CES 2014, a hands-on look with Roku TV, and Brian Tong's first ever "C-E-Yes or C-E-No"

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Netatmo June: UV sensor for your wrist

Skin protection in a wearable? The June hopes to keep your sun exposure controlled with a modicum of bling.

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Johannes Kepler's birthday celebrated with Google doodle

Google has celebrated the man who first noticed that planets moved around the Sun in an elliptical orbit.

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Some of the big moments in tech this past year ranged from space to spacey, and human biology to humanoid robots. Here's a collection of images that represent 2013's big stories, with innovation an overriding theme. 
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We've chosen the images for their impact. Robots have advanced and become more animalistic or human-like. Private companies have rocketed into space. And some of the images are arty expressions of our world through sculpture and light.
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Virgin Galactic's <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-19514_3-57601804-239/get-up-close-and-supersonic-with-virgin-galactics-spaceshiptwo/" >SpaceShipTwo</a>, for example, billed as the world's first commercial space plane, notched an important milestone by <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57581868-1/spaceshiptwo-fires-rocket-engine-in-supersonic-flight/" >firing its rocket engine</a> during flight on April 29. It was a test flight at Mojave Air and Space Port in California. 
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During the flight, the space-ready passenger <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57581868-1/spaceshiptwo-fires-rocket-engine-in-supersonic-flight/" >space plane detached</a> from its dual-hull mothership, WhiteKnightTwo, at an altitude of 47,000 feet while being piloted by Mark Stucky and Mike Alsbury of builder Scaled Composites.
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2013: The year in pictures

From human biology to humanoid robots, we take you on a visual journey back through the year, with innovation an overriding theme.

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