Facial recognition

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Google co-founder Sergey Brin wearing Google Glass.

Google Glass privacy concerns persist in Congress

U.S. representative says he's "disappointed" by Google's response to Congress members who have expressed privacy worries over the wearable tech.

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They may not be stylin', but they are a privacy enhancement.

Privacy glasses screw with facial recognition systems

Prototype glasses equipped with near-infrared LEDs can fend off facial recognition systems by blinding them with science.

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Xbox One vs. PlayStation 4

On the cusp of their release into the public's eager embrace, here's the blow-by-blow of how the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One compare with one another. Now, fight!

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Google nixes facial recognition in Glass for now

The company declares it won't approve facial recognition in software for its high-tech specs "at this time" -- saying strong privacy protections will need to be in place first.

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Finding faces in Google Maps terrain

Using facial recognition software, a team has created a program that crawls Google Maps, seeking out faces hidden in the Earth's folds. Do you see what it sees?

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Xbox One vs. PlayStation 4

With initial details revealed for the Xbox One, we finally have a chance to directly compare it with that other yet-to-be-released gaming console, the PlayStation 4.

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The odds are you are not just a face in the crowd any longer.  Even if your picture isn't on the Internet, computer facial recognition technology in public places is making it harder to remain anonymous.  Lesley Stahl reports on Sunday, May 19 at 7 p.m. ET/PT.

The looming big business of facial recognition

A "60 Minutes" report this Sunday will look at the new ways this technology is being used that even has one of its inventors calling it too intrusive. Here's a preview.

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 In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings, police have been pouring over surveillance footage and amateur video and photos, in the search for evidence. Just a few years ago, this process would have taken hundreds of investigative man hours. Now it takes just minutes or even seconds, thanks to technology like facial recognition and object tracking. CNET's Kara Tsuboi reports.

Facial recognition cuts investigation time down to seconds

In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings, police have been poring over surveillance footage and amateur video and photos in the search for evidence. Just a few years ago, this process would have taken hundreds of investigative man-hours. Now it takes just minutes or even seconds, thanks to technology like facial recognition and object tracking. CNET's Kara Tsuboi reports.

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Boston bombings: How facial recognition can cut investigation time to seconds

Videos taken at the crime scene could hold important clues. But it's a different kind of fast-forward investigators can now use to review all the footage. CNET's Kara Tsuboi goes face-to-face with facial recognition and surveillance.

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SimSensei is a "virtual human platform" designed for use in healthcare settings.

Feeling kind of blue? This digital avatar can tell

University of Southern California researchers are developing SimSensei, an avatar that uses facial recognition tech and depth-sensing cameras built into Microsoft's Kinect to conduct mental health interviews.

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Anti-drone revolt prompts push for new federal, state laws

Concerns about privacy, facial recognition, cell phone tracking, and infrared surveillance have dealt a setback to law enforcement's growing enthusiasm for aerial drones.

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Foil face-recognition cameras with Privacy Visor

These dorky goggles shine near-infrared light to confuse computer vision systems. Are they the shades of the future?

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