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Google and Microsoft's new child abuse measures criticised

Google and Microsoft today introduced measures to tackle online child abuse -- but critics say the restrictions "will mean very little."

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<p>Technology's richest can't seem to stay away from wacky desires -- to live forever, to colonize other planets, to recreate the plot line of "Deep Impact," minus the apocalypse. Here's a quick tour of some of the most <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-10797_3-57608544-235/billion-dollar-babies-far-out-pet-projects-of-the-tech-elite/">far-out pet projects of the tech billionaires club</a>.</p>



<p> Tesla Motors and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk isn't content with being a real-life inspiration for "Iron Man's" Tony Stark. No, he'd like to expand from superhero to secret agent, specifically James Bond. So he purchased a <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57608010-93/elon-musk-is-the-anonymous-buyer-of-the-james-bond-lotus-submarine/" >Lotus Esprit submarine from the 1979 film</a>, "The Spy Who Loved Me," for $1 million at auction. He hopes to infuse it with some Tesla magic and a dash of millionaire mad genius. 

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"It was amazing as a little kid in South Africa to watch James Bond in 'The Spy Who Loved Me' drive his Lotus Esprit off a pier, press a button, and have it transform into a submarine underwater. I was disappointed to learn that it can't actually transform," Musk said. "What I'm going to do is upgrade it with a Tesla electric powertrain and try to make it transform for real."

Tech billionaires chase their wildest dreams (pictures)

Given the wealth concentrated in Silicon Valley, it's no surprise that tech CEOs and founders put their money toward the seemingly impossible, on land, on sea, and in space.

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Where your Moto X gets made (pictures)

Go inside the Fort Worth, Texas, factory where the first phone from Google's Motorola is being assembled by American workers. It takes up an area roughly equivalent to three football fields.

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<p>The computerization of cars has already begun, but the technology will take off dramatically now with the mobile Internet and self-driving vehicles.</p><p>

This self-driving Nissan Leaf, for example, is a prototype that the company says will lead to self-driving vehicles in mass production by 2020.</p><p>
Click on for more technology that's changing the auto industry, or read <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57595738-76/how-googles-robo-cars-mean-the-end-of-driving-as-we-know-it/">CNET's stories on the marriage of computing technology and cars</a>.

Cars and computers: A look at the future of autos (pictures)

The computerization of cars has already begun, but the technology will take off dramatically now with the mobile Internet and self-driving vehicles. Here's a look at technology that's changing the auto industry.

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Electric BMW i3 comes with backup vehicle

BMW may ease i3 road trip worries by loaning other cars, iPhone "5C" packaging spotted online, and more details leak about the Moto X smartphone.

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Will the Nexus 7 finally get a friend?

Friday Poll: What do you want Google to unveil next week?

Google's upcoming breakfast event with the company's new Android chief could result in anything from a fresh Android update to a new Nexus tablet.

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Smartwatches, smartphones, and a sneaky little tablet made the rumor mill freak out this week.

No Retina iPad Mini for the holidays

Smartwatches, smartphones, and a sneaky little tablet made the rumor mill freak out this week.

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The iPad Mini isn't so easy to take apart.

Rumor Has It: No Retina iPad Mini in your holiday stocking

Smartwatches, smartphones, and a sneaky little tablet made the rumor mill freak out this week.

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Google event next week could usher Android update

A mysterious invite to a breakfast event with Google's new Android chief is short on clues, but big on promise.

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A classic Larry Page through-the-looking-glass pose. Not, sadly, at a wedding.

Groom with a view? Larry Page wears Google Glass at wedding

It's what every well-groomed groomsman is wearing these days: the goggles that make everyone goggle. Yes, even in Croatia.

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A leaked video shows the Moto X responds to voice commands without needing to touch the screen. Also, Microsoft's Surface tablet and BlackBerry's Z10 smartphone see big price drops.

Moto X always-on voice commands revealed

A leaked video shows the Moto X responds to voice commands without needing to touch the screen. Also, Microsoft's Surface tablet and BlackBerry's Z10 smartphone see big price drops.

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Nokia this week grabbed the attention of smartphone users and photographers when it unveiled the Lumia 1020, a phone that packs a wallop with a 41-megapixel camera.
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And make no mistake about it: it's all about the camera. The Lumia 1020's stunningly enormous image resolution is this smartphone's single killer feature and sole reason for being. Yep, <a href="http://reviews.cnet.com/nokia-lumia-1020/" >the 1020 puts the mega back in megapixels</a>.

Pictures of the Week (slideshow)

A few of the best images from the world of technology this week.

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