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Find anyone's first tweet thanks to Twitter's 8th birthday

It's a happy birthday to Twitter today and, to celebrate, it's built a tool to help you find all those awkward first tweets.

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XCAR is a home for everyone who has a passion for cars.

XCAR Awards 2013 - Person of the Year

We've met a lot of fascinating characters in the Automotive world, but who has resonated most with the XCAR team?

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If Elon Musk and <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57554583-76/elon-musks-plan-for-life-on-mars/" >SpaceX are looking to inhabit far away worlds</a>, it might make sense to find the most Earth-like places possible, with virgin air and untouched water. With the recent discovery of water on distant exoplanets, we might be one step closer to that reality.
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Using the Hubble Space Telescope's powerful Wide Field Camera 3, which is capable of peering at exoplanets trillions of miles away, two teams of scientists have found faint signatures of water in the atmospheres of five distant planets.
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The strengths of the water signatures varied on the five planets WASP-17b, HD209458b, WASP-12b, WASP-19b, and XO-1b. Each orbit a star, allowing for observation. WASP-17b and HD209458b had the strongest signals, but the readings from the other three planets -- WASP-12b, WASP-19b and XO-1b -- also are consistent with evidence of water.
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The presence of atmospheric water was reported previously on a few exoplanets orbiting stars beyond our solar system, but this is the first study to measure conclusively and compare the profiles and intensities of these signatures on multiple worlds.

5 planets most likely to be on Elon Musk's itinerary (pictures)

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected faint traces of water in the atmospheres of five faraway worlds.

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CNET's Tech Turkeys of 2013 (pictures)

A compilation of the worst, most embarrassing gaffes in technology this year. Gobble gobble.

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On November 20, 1998, when some of us were adjusting to life in a college dorm, the first part of the International Space Station launched from Kazakhstan atop a Russian Proton rocket. Astronauts aboard the space shuttle Endeavour would connect a second module two weeks later, beginning a multiyear construction process for one of the largest and most complex projects ever requiring broad international cooperation. Full assembly of the ISS was finally completed in 2011. In its first 15 years, more than 1,500 science experiments have been conducted at the ISS, with 68 partnering countries and astronauts representing 15 nations making 139 flights to the station.

Milestone moments from 15 years of the ISS (pictures)

The first piece of the International Space Station launched from Kazakhstan on this day in 1998. Here are some milestones from its first 15 years in orbit.

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<p>Technology's richest can't seem to stay away from wacky desires -- to live forever, to colonize other planets, to recreate the plot line of "Deep Impact," minus the apocalypse. Here's a quick tour of some of the most <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-10797_3-57608544-235/billion-dollar-babies-far-out-pet-projects-of-the-tech-elite/">far-out pet projects of the tech billionaires club</a>.</p>



<p> Tesla Motors and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk isn't content with being a real-life inspiration for "Iron Man's" Tony Stark. No, he'd like to expand from superhero to secret agent, specifically James Bond. So he purchased a <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57608010-93/elon-musk-is-the-anonymous-buyer-of-the-james-bond-lotus-submarine/" >Lotus Esprit submarine from the 1979 film</a>, "The Spy Who Loved Me," for $1 million at auction. He hopes to infuse it with some Tesla magic and a dash of millionaire mad genius. 

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"It was amazing as a little kid in South Africa to watch James Bond in 'The Spy Who Loved Me' drive his Lotus Esprit off a pier, press a button, and have it transform into a submarine underwater. I was disappointed to learn that it can't actually transform," Musk said. "What I'm going to do is upgrade it with a Tesla electric powertrain and try to make it transform for real."

Tech billionaires chase their wildest dreams (pictures)

Given the wealth concentrated in Silicon Valley, it's no surprise that tech CEOs and founders put their money toward the seemingly impossible, on land, on sea, and in space.

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Electronic makeup turns devices on and off with a blink, the underwater Internet is swimming to an ocean near you, and video-chat with your pet while at work.

Electronic makeup gives new meaning to inter-'face,' Ep. 142

Electronic makeup turns devices on and off with a blink, the underwater Internet is swimming to an ocean near you, and video-chat with your pet while at work.

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<p><i>Editor's note: Since Samsung seems willing to take on just about any idea, Crave's Eric Mack decided to suggest some projects he'd like to see the gargantuan Korean conglomerate take on, starting with the creation of a whole new market -- foldable electronics. </i>
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For years now, Samsung and others have been teasing prototype <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-20127014-1/samsung-will-soon-sell-bendable-phones-too/" >flexible displays</a>, and Samsung just recently introduced the first smartphone with a <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57606620-94/samsung-galaxy-round-brings-curve-to-smartphones/" >curved screen</a>. That's pretty nifty, but what I'd really like to see are fully foldable (or perhaps rollable) devices. Today's tablets are pretty great, but how much better could they be if they could be folded up to slip into your back pocket? </p>

<p>"But what about the batteries and other components!" you might shout in disbelief.</p><p>

Fortunately, <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57606615-94/lg-to-launch-flexible-batteries-is-bend-the-new-black/" >LG</a> says it's already got that covered. Time to put all the pieces together and get me a device I can fold up and stuff in my wallet -- I nominate you for the job, Samsung.</p>

9 products Samsung should take on (pictures)

Samsung clearly seems willing and able to mass produce just about any idea under its own moniker. Here are a few products within the huge conglomerate's areas of expertise that Crave's Eric Mack would like to see made.

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<p>With Elon Musk's next-generation transportation system, <a href="http://news.cnet.com/2300-11386_3-10017848-1.html" >the Hyperloop</a>, recently unveiled, many are calling into question moving forward with high-speed trains.
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Musk claims the Hyperloop will cost a fraction of what's need to pay for high-speed rail projects. For example, California's high-speed rail route from San Francisco to Los Angeles is currently <a href="http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=50151656n" >budgeted at $68 billion</a> for a trip that will take 3 hours. Musk said the Hyperloop aims to make the trip in 35 minutes -- and will cost just $6 billion to build.
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But with the <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-31322_3-57598213-256/hyperloop-why-cant-we-believe-in-the-big-ideas/" >Hyperloop still a dream</a>, for now, high-speed rail is our best option for medium distance transportation. Here, we take a look at a few of the fastest trains in the world.
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The Frecciarossa 1000, seen above, also known as the V300 Zefiro and ETR 1000, is a next-generation high-speed train developed by Bombardier Transportation and AnsaldoBreda. The $2 billion, 220-mph train will go into service in 2015, making the trip from Rome to Milan in just 2.2 hours.
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All aboard the world’s fastest trains (pictures)

Elon Musk's Hyperloop is just a pipe dream, but these superfast trains are already up and running.

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Hoopla over Elon Musk's Hyperloop

The CEO of SpaceX pushes for a high-speed tube transport, Samsung lowers the price of curved OLED TVs, and Microsoft reverses its stance on the Xbox One's Kinect.

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The CEO of SpaceX pushes for a high-speed tube transport, Samsung lowers the price of curved OLED TVs, and Microsoft reverses its stance on the Xbox One's Kinect.

Hoopla over Elon Musk's Hyperloop

The CEO of SpaceX pushes for a high-speed tube transport, Samsung lowers the price of curved OLED TVs, and Microsoft reverses its stance on the Xbox One's Kinect.

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Internet pop culture with snarky commentary.

Ep. 1320: Where we're stuck in a hyperloop

Newshounds Mark Milian and Peter Ha drop by to discuss the bathroom situation on Elon Musk's Hyperloop proposal. We'll also ask Peter why he reattached the cord and brainstorm how Apple's Parallax could hold the key to a 3D iPhone.

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