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Astronauts taste space lettuce, become zero-g food critics

After months of anticipation, astronauts finally get their fresh greens by nibbling on just-harvested space-grown lettuce.

By August 10, 2015


Zero G is the Spider-Man of iPhone 6 cases

The Zero G "anti-gravity" case from Mega Tiny Corporation uses NanoSuction material to make your iPhone 6 or 6 Plus stick to any smooth surface and stay stuck indefinitely.

By March 30, 2015


Mega Tiny Corp's Zero G Nano Suction iPhone 6 case defies gravity

This upcoming iPhone 6/6 Plus case incorporates NanoSuction material that emulates the adhesive qualities of gecko feet to stick to any flat surface.

By March 30, 2015


The ISS gets its Zero-G 3D printer

The International Space Station has received its 3D printer, installed in its Microgravity Science Glovebox to move towards self sufficiency.

By November 17, 2014


Astronaut's zero-g rendition of Bowie makes triumphant return

Chris Hadfield's hit rendition of David Bowie's famous space song is once again available for all to enjoy.

By November 4, 2014


Win a Zero-G flight... and maybe even a Trip to Space!

5...4...3...2...1...competition! CNET UK and Symantec are giving you a crack at a zero gravity flight, and maybe even a chance to go into Space. Cosmic!

By December 22, 2008


Hacking food with virtual reality changes how you eat

A new series from Vice kicks off by visiting a Japanese scientist who hacks our perceptions to mess with our rates of food consumption and perception of flavors.

By October 8, 2015


What happens to astronaut poop? NASA finally has an answer

Astronaut Scott Kelly is spending a year in space, and you might be surprised (and probably a little grossed out) by what happens to all the waste generated in that period.

By September 14, 2015


One giant leaf for mankind: Astronauts eat lettuce grown in space

As part of an experiment to further International Space Station self-sufficiency, astronauts are sampling leafy greens grown in Zero-G.

By August 9, 2015


We ask why the universe is giving up on itself (Tomorrow Daily 223)

Ashley and Khail discuss the futility of life after learning the universe is slowly making fewer stars, explain how the "John Wick" franchise will utilize VR and watch astronauts eat lettuce grown in space.

By August 11, 2015