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Astronauts taste space lettuce, become zero-g food critics

After months of anticipation, astronauts finally get their fresh greens by nibbling on just-harvested space-grown lettuce.

By August 10, 2015


Zero G is the Spider-Man of iPhone 6 cases

The Zero G "anti-gravity" case from Mega Tiny Corporation uses NanoSuction material to make your iPhone 6 or 6 Plus stick to any smooth surface and stay stuck indefinitely.

By March 30, 2015


Mega Tiny Corp's Zero G Nano Suction iPhone 6 case defies gravity

This upcoming iPhone 6/6 Plus case incorporates NanoSuction material that emulates the adhesive qualities of gecko feet to stick to any flat surface.

By March 30, 2015


The ISS gets its Zero-G 3D printer

The International Space Station has received its 3D printer, installed in its Microgravity Science Glovebox to move towards self sufficiency.

By November 17, 2014


Astronaut's zero-g rendition of Bowie makes triumphant return

Chris Hadfield's hit rendition of David Bowie's famous space song is once again available for all to enjoy.

By November 4, 2014


Win a Zero-G flight... and maybe even a Trip to Space!

5...4...3...2...1...competition! CNET UK and Symantec are giving you a crack at a zero gravity flight, and maybe even a chance to go into Space. Cosmic!

By December 22, 2008


Leaf on Mars: Can NASA grow a garden on the Red Planet?

What will it take to grow plants on Mars? We already have the technology -- and "The Martian" wasn't far off the mark.

By October 25, 2015


Hacking food with virtual reality changes how you eat

A new series from Vice kicks off by visiting a Japanese scientist who hacks our perceptions to mess with our rates of food consumption and perception of flavors.

By October 8, 2015


One giant leaf for mankind: Astronauts eat lettuce grown in space

As part of an experiment to further International Space Station self-sufficiency, astronauts are sampling leafy greens grown in Zero-G.

By August 9, 2015


What happens to astronaut poop? NASA finally has an answer

Astronaut Scott Kelly is spending a year in space, and you might be surprised (and probably a little grossed out) by what happens to all the waste generated in that period.

By September 14, 2015