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Chrysler teams with cellulosic-ethanol firm ZeaChem

Seeking to boost its activity in renewable fuels, Chrysler is partnering with biofuels and chemicals start-up ZeaChem to speed adoption of cellulosic ethanol.

By Aug. 15, 2011

Article

Microbes to start making ethanol, chemicals

Cellulosic ethanol start-up ZeaChem begins construction on a plant in Oregon that will use a microorganism found in termite stomachs to convert wood into fuel.

By Nov. 18, 2009

Article

Termite stomach bug to make ethanol

Start-up ZeaChem raises $34 million to build a cellulosic ethanol plant that uses the microbes in termites' guts, rather than genetically designed specialty bugs.

By Jan. 7, 2009

Article

Is vinegar the secret ingredient for biofuels?

ZeaChem devises a process in which a microbe from termite guts converts plant matter into acetic acid. The acid is then turned into fuel.

By Mar. 12, 2008

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Trash-to-ethanol company gets $19.5 million more

Coskata gets nearly $20 million as the debate over who has the best ethanol continues.

By Mar. 13, 2008

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Multicultural biofuel made from toughest part of the plant

Lignin is tough stuff, but Washington University has a way to turn at least some of it into fuel.

By Jan. 16, 2008

Article

'Green' gas and diesel get boost in biofuel grants

Federal government pumps more than $600 million in projects to demonstrate advanced biofuels, including cellulosic ethanol and plant-based replacements for diesel, jet fuel, and gasoline.

By Dec. 4, 2009

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Companies to watch in green tech: Transportation

News.com reporters list the five companies leading the charge in greening up the automotive industry.

By Apr. 21, 2008

Article

Range Fuels gets $100 million to build ethanol plant

There's a big ol' refinery coming to the woods of Georgia.

By Mar. 14, 2008

Article

Coskata CEO explains how to get to $1 a gallon ethanol

Here is Coskata's business plan in a nutshell: take garbage, make gas out of it, and feed it to microbes. Then a big company pays you to teach them how to do it.

By Apr. 7, 2008